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I have seen editing help, but I couldn't find how to add a space to the code snippet.

For example, this :

1
 2
 3

Should look like this (1 space in the last line) :
1
_2
_3
_

So, how do I add a line with only spaces in the code?

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Why do you need a blank line at the end? –  Time Traveling Bobby Sep 8 '11 at 10:03
1  
@Straitjacket Take a look at this : stackoverflow.com/questions/7345649/… –  BЈовић Sep 8 '11 at 10:50
    
Oh, output formatting...right. Missed that one. –  Time Traveling Bobby Sep 8 '11 at 10:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can do that using the HTML tags <pre><code> instead of indentation by 4 spaces:

<pre><code>1
 2
 3
&nbsp;</code></pre>

will give

1
 2
 3
 

Since you're using this for formatting output, you probably don't want syntax highlighting anyway; then you should omit the <code> and </code> tags. (Kinda obvious: don't use 'em if it ain't code.)

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Enter a non-breaking space - not the &nbsp; version, the proper unicode version - after four normal spaces and the result is:

1
 2
 3
 

On Windows you enter this with Alt + ( Keypad 0, Keypad 1, Keypad 6, Keypad 0 ).

On Mac OS X you enter this with Alt + Space.

Unfortunately, I don't know how to enter it directly on Linux...

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First I thought of this, too, but it has the disadvantage that if people copy-and-paste that code, they may catch the unicode space without noticing. –  Hendrik Vogt Sep 8 '11 at 9:29
    
@Hendrik, hmmm true. But I guess that'll teach them to not copy-paste random code without checking it thoroughly? –  DMA57361 Sep 8 '11 at 9:32
    
Your workaround is still good to keep in mind, but the nasty thing about the unicode space is that even with thorough checking it's hard to discover. –  Hendrik Vogt Sep 8 '11 at 9:53

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