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If I want to be clarified about an answer given (and accepted as well) but the question is pretty old (ex: this answer in 2009), would commenting on the answer work?

Or is it ok to ask a new question giving the link to that answer?

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

would commenting on the answer work?

Commenting the answer should send a notification to the person who posted that answer, thereby allowing the person to reply to you.

However, if you haven't received a reply, then you could ask a new question pointing to the old question and clearly mentioning what is not clear.

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Maybe he means "clarification of" instead of "to clarify an"? So his question would be basically "Can someone clarify this very old answer?" – agf Oct 25 '11 at 7:41
    
@agf yeah, hence the last line :) – Sathya Oct 25 '11 at 7:43
    
yes I meant get the answer clarified .(simply : ask for more details about the answer) but I'm not going to clarify the answer itself. – DinushanM Oct 25 '11 at 7:47
    
@D-Shan updated question & answer – Sathya Oct 25 '11 at 7:51
1  
+1 for "clearly mentioning what is not clear". A simple "can someone explain in more detail" is not very useful. – Joachim Sauer Oct 25 '11 at 8:15

You can also add a bounty to the question and add a custom message which details what you're looking for...

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Does this notify the post owners as Sathya's comment method does? – Kevin Vermeer Oct 25 '11 at 14:28
    
@KevinVermeer: Eh, dunno if they get something in their inbox. But if OP doesn't answer, someone will. – Won't Oct 25 '11 at 14:58

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