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I just created as part of an edit on this question, but on poking around I discovered that already exists and seems to be being used for the same concept. The 20 questions on are few enough that I would happily edit them all individually, but before doing so I thought I should probably establish which is preferred for a tag name, an initialism or the full words?

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4 Answers 4

Another factor is that tags can only be 25 characters long. This is why some will be abbreviations and others will be spelt out in full.

In this case it makes sense to set up as a synonym of

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2  
Preferably rpn a synonym of reverse-polish-notation, so that the visible name is the clearer one. –  Gilles Dec 1 '11 at 18:06
    
@Gilles - either way works! –  ChrisF Dec 1 '11 at 19:05
    
so that the visible name is the clearer one. That only works in one direction. –  Gilles Dec 1 '11 at 21:26

Abbreviations are often ambiguous. What do you think TLA means? Prefer the long, expressive name whenever possible (there's a 25-character limit).

Here the better tag name is . There doesn't seem to be another meaning of RPN that's relevant to programming, so make a synonym. When two tags are synonyms, the master tag is what is displayed; this should be the most readable version of the name. When someone types , the expansion to provides confirmation of what is meant.

This doesn't apply to technologies that are universally known by their acronym, such as or , for which the acronym is the right tag.

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If the initial is not ambiguous and is well known (in this case, it is), I would rather see the acronym.

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I have seen tags in abbreviated formats like , .

May be can be a synonym to or the other way around.

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