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Using this question as an example - Get index value from collection

I feel it should be tagged with c# as well, since that's the implementation language used in the answer. Although the OP did not specify whether he was working with C# or VB .NET - or didn't have a preference.

The question is: Will my count of C# total votes be increased if I'm the own who changes the question tag to c#? And is this "ethical" to do so? I could see a small potential for abuse if someone was trying to inflate their score within a particular tag. I suppose improper tags might eventually be removed...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yes. It doesn't matter who retags the question. If you have a non community wiki answer on a question with a tag it will count towards the score and answer totals for the tag badges.

And, before anyone else comments - it is therefore theoretically possible to game the badge by adding a tag to a question where you have a highly up-voted answer. However, if the tag is not relevant it will probably get removed and the tag badges are one of the few badges that can (and do) get revoked, so it won't help you in the long run.

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I hadn't thought about whether they could be revoked so thanks for pointing that out. –  Yuck Dec 6 '11 at 13:51
  1. Yes, your tag score will be increased.

  2. The purpose of tags is to get some order into the questions, so if a question should have a c# tag then you should retag it, it doesn't matter if you have an advantage from that or not. If the question does not have the correct tags, it will be "lost" because it will not be found when another one is searching for this tag. If a question has a wrong tag, I am quite sure another user comes along who will remove this tag.

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