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I usually link to the article, often a Wikipedia article, but sometimes I just want a way to name the acronym, without linking to the article. Is there correct code I would use so when you mouse over, or click it shows the acronym, but something that is not confused with a broken link?

An added bonus would be if the system could automatically label this sort of thing.

Example Question using Compsci (Computer Science)

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I think the feature request is here: Defining a term with markdown or HTML. – Arjan Dec 26 '11 at 19:44
up vote 10 down vote accepted

This is very similar to the request to add support for the <abbr> or <acronym> tags, which was requested three years ago but never added. I'd also like to see something like this supported.


FYI, you can add a title attribute to your links, so that users who hover over them for a couple of seconds can see the unabbreviated form. Using HTML:

<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secure_Sockets_Layer" title="Secure Sockets Layer" >SSL</a>

SSL

Using Markdown (see FAQ):

You need to foo that bar over [SSL][ssl]!

  [ssl]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secure_Sockets_Layer
         "Secure Sockets Layer"

You need to foo that bar over SSL!

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Looks like a great idea to me! All that is needed is an alternate CSS. I like the idea of dashed lines. – George Bailey Dec 26 '11 at 19:50
3  
Just FYI: <acronym> was deprecated in HTML 4.01 and is no longer supported in HTML 5. Only <abbr> is allowed now. – animuson Dec 26 '11 at 19:52
3  
When abusing links, then there's no need for HTML; see Advanced Links in the Markdown help. – Arjan Dec 26 '11 at 19:56

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