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Here's a question that is about the same topic as the one I want to ask: Is Telerik Extensions for ASP. NET MVC Free?

Its answer is outdated — at least, the license explanation on the vendor site changed — and I have several more aspects to ask about that are not mentioned in either the answer or the question.

Should I create new question, or write an edit for the old one (the old one is not mine)? I once lost a lot of reputation after making the wrong choice in a situation like this, and would like to avoid having that happen again.

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several more aspects to ask – please keep in mind we basically like one question per post. –  Arjan Dec 28 '11 at 11:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Some points to consider:

  • If you think the answer is outdated, offer a bounty. There is a specific reason you can add to the bounty to indicate that the answer is outdated.

  • If you have "several more aspects to ask", you've already determined that the question is fundamentally different, and therefore should be an additional question. Although be aware, (as per Arjan's comment) that we want one question per post, make sure that the aspects you are asking about are in relation to the single overriding question being asked by the post.

  • You should never update a question with your additional details or questions; that is changing the intent of the post, something that is severely frowned upon here at Stack Overflow.

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Go ahead and ask your question, you can post link to the existing question explaining why yours is different.

Worst case, your question will be closed as duplicate but you should not lose any reputation because of that.

More than that.. if the answer is really outdated you can post comment and ask the author to edit it, then it might fit your needs as well.

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