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Our networking people have been trying out new and improved ways to make our lives miserable. Recently, they've taken to blocking out all JavaScript on our network. However, when I work offsite, I can download all the scripts for the SE sites and they'll stay cached in my browser and voting, leaving comments, etc all works.

However, if I ever cast the 5th vote to close a question, all the cached scripts seems to disappear and I can't re-download them if I'm on the work network. Losing voting and commenting isn't too annoying but without JS, every post I make has to go through the captcha and that's very annoying.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It doesn't necessarily invalidate, but the page reload (which happens with the 5th vote because closing a question changes the page a lot) may cause the browser to issue a request asking "Is the file I have still up to date?". See Matt's answer for more.

I'm afraid all you can do is set up some sort of proxy on your machine to redirect the requests to a locally stored copy of our JS files. This of course assumes you have admin permissions on your laptop; based on your story, I wouldn't be surprised if you don't.

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4  
I skipped the usual part about yelling at your IT department or finding a new job. I'm sure you thought of that yourself. –  balpha Jan 5 '12 at 16:59

FWIW, I just tried this on Chrome 16, XP SP3 on a few Stack Overflow questions, and did not experience this; upon being redirected because of the vote the assets were still returning a 304 (Not Modified) code.

enter image description here

Stack Exchange version the assets (JavaScript and CSS) by the contents of each file, and as they deploy code multiple times each day, a possible explanation for you experiencing this is that they're deploying a new version of the JavaScript, causing a new version to be requested, which is getting blocked at your workplace.

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7  
Even a request that comes back with a 304 is still a request -- if they block the request in the first place, say, based on the .js extension (and e.g. return a 404), that'll tell the browser "it's gone!". –  balpha Jan 5 '12 at 16:51
    
Please don't tell me someone would block a request based on its extension? –  uɐɯsO uɐɥʇɐN Jan 5 '12 at 22:28
    
@George alright, then I won't tell you sigh –  z - Jan 6 '12 at 3:36

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