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I was doing a search on [circular-dependency] [c#]. Scroll to the question which starts with "How should I arrange my projects/classes in .NET to avoid circular dependecies". It shows person "Patrick from NDepend team". I assume that person is the poster? Sometimes it's one of the repliers. Now go to the question itself. That person doesn't show anywhere.

So what's the connection between the person in the search result and when viewing the question?

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1 Answer

I assume that person is the poster?

No. He's not. He's last modifier/poster

modified Aug 29 '10 at 19:15

In this case, his answer has been deleted

deleted by owner Aug 29 '10 at 19:52

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Where do you see that? I don't see any edits. –  Matthew Read Jan 6 '12 at 18:48
    
@Matthew he's not editor, but answerer. There's a hidden answer –  Martin. Jan 6 '12 at 18:50
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Ah, deleted? That makes sense. I'd almost make that a [bug] or [feature-request] to show the last relevant modifier. –  Matthew Read Jan 6 '12 at 18:51
    
I don't see "Patrick from NDepend team" anymore. Did they fix this already? –  Some Helpful Commenter Jan 6 '12 at 19:06
    
In the search result I always assumed the person is the original poster and that makes sense to me. If it's the last answerer, or the one with the most votes or last editor or like this one, a deleted answerer, these are confusing.. Which one is it? But that's a different issue. –  Tony_Henrich Jan 6 '12 at 19:09
    
@ConradFrix: Sort by activity. Here –  Martin. Jan 6 '12 at 19:18
    
@Tony_Henrich: if you sort by activity, I think it makes more sense to sort by activity & show last activity –  Martin. Jan 6 '12 at 19:19
    
@Martin missed that thanks –  Some Helpful Commenter Jan 6 '12 at 19:21
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