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Let's say I'm discussing something in meta and I want to link to a question or answer to support my point:

It is considered acceptable to remind a user to mark your answer as the solution.

What's the standard way on SO to handle linking to multiple URLs instead of just one in this scenario?

It is considered acceptable[1][2][3] to remind a user to mark your answer as the solution.

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2  
Actually, I do like option 2. Very "Wikipedia-esque" of you. –  Al E. Jan 9 '12 at 19:46
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@AlEverett Do you think it would need the equivalent of a citation "references section" to be complete? –  Keith Walton Jan 9 '12 at 19:50
    
I added an answer below with this style of linking. –  Keith Walton Jan 9 '12 at 20:44

4 Answers 4

My preferred way is to linkify each word like this:

It is considered acceptable to remind a user to mark your answer as the solution.

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What if you have a different number of links to words? I could see doing this if each URL was somehow "more" associated with that particular word than the others. –  Keith Walton Jan 9 '12 at 19:44
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If I run out of words to linkify, I will sometimes re-word the comment to be longer, or add "Also, see here and here". Personally, I find lots of links in things like that to be fun and it always makes me smile, but that could just be my own strange sense of nerdy entertainment from simple cleverness. –  cdeszaq Jan 9 '12 at 19:47
    
+1, as the second option is harder to target. –  Won't Jan 9 '12 at 20:22

"Best"?

I don't know about "best", but this seems like a good way:

It is considered acceptable to remind a user to mark your answer as the solution. (See also: this answer from Steve and this other answer with a slightly different take.)

It doesn't interrupt the flow of the original sentence while also indicating that there's more information to be had.

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1  
I've seen the "this and this" and "here and here" approach, but I don't like it. To me this is like using "Click Here" as link text. –  Keith Walton Jan 9 '12 at 19:41
    
@Keith: True enough. Jakob Nielsen would rap my knuckles. I'll update my answer. –  Al E. Jan 9 '12 at 19:42
    
But is linkifying "this and this" better or worse than linking "random" words in the sentence? –  cdeszaq Jan 9 '12 at 19:43
    
I like your updated answer better. I just wonder if a document that does alot of this would get cluttered. –  Keith Walton Jan 9 '12 at 19:45
    
tangent –  Al E. Jan 9 '12 at 19:48
    
Updated question: "best way" changed to "standard way on SO". –  Keith Walton Jan 9 '12 at 20:00
    
@cdeszaq I think linking random words is worse than linking, "here, here and here" (although I don't like either, see my answer). –  ThinkingStiff Jan 9 '12 at 21:15

I would always qualify the link with something useful, not just a random word or a number (I went into detail in a recent post: Link formatting in posts of established users). For an answer, the useful piece of data is the question title and/or the answerer's name.

It is considered acceptable (@BilltheLizard, @Peter Ajtai, @bananakata) to remind a user to mark your answer as the solution.

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There appears to be some interest in the citation style, so I have added this answer judge interest in it:

It is considered acceptable[1] [2] [3] to remind a user to mark your answer as the solution.

...botom of post...

  1. Answer by @BillTheLizard - Do you feel dirty if you nudge new users...
  2. Answer by @PeterAjtai - Do you feel dirty if you nudge new users...
  3. Answer by @squillman - Do you feel dirty if you nudge new users...

Leaving off the superscript tag would allow for a bigger target:

It is considered acceptable[1][2][3] to remind a user to mark your answer as the solution.

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