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Today a user commented on an Area51 post of mine about the 10 posts (questions + answers) required to fulfill a commitment. He got the Beta badge on Poker and his Area 51 profile shows the commitment fulfilled, but he's only made 8 posts on that site. Have the requirements changed? If not, is it perhaps counting deleted posts or something?

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I've posted six answers and a question on Sports and that was enough. No deleted posts either. –  mmyers Feb 23 '12 at 20:01
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There was a fellow who blasted the Biblical Hermeneutics site with 10 quick questions. (Not complaining about that; most were good.) When someone asked why he had done that, he said he wanted to fulfill his commitment so that he could commit somewhere else. I checked back with his Area 51 profile once in a while for several months and the commitment stuck. Now I see that it's cleared. All of which to say, it seems, um, inconsistent. –  Jon Ericson Feb 23 '12 at 22:20
    
@JonEricson what do you mean by "Now I see that it's cleared."? The software reversed his previously fulfilled commitment after having first indicated for several months that he had fulfilled his commitment? –  CopyrightX May 9 '13 at 1:20
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@CopyrightX: I mean: the commitment was not cleared for a long time and then it was. And I checked again and it still is cleared. I can't tell if he was able to commit to anything else though... –  Jon Ericson May 9 '13 at 4:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yeah, the requirements can be slightly lower if you're an active participant during the private beta. Asking and answering are still the quickest / easiest way to fulfill commitment though, regardless of when you do it.

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Is cancelling Meta bounties a thing now? :P –  Matthew Read May 15 '13 at 21:54
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It is if I'm just answering a support question. You can probably find something more useful to do with the meta rep. –  Shog9 May 15 '13 at 22:01
    
Makes sense, thanks. –  Matthew Read May 15 '13 at 22:42
    
So I participated in Network Engineering during its private beta with two questions (one I deleted voluntarily as it was fast on its way to being closed by others) and two answers. Since it went public I posted several other answers so that my NE profile currently shows I've posted 1 question and 9 answers. That was >24 hours ago, and still my area51 profile shows zero fulfilled commitments. Do I need to contribute more to NE to fulfill my commitment there? Or do I need to wait awhile before my profile shows the fulfilled commitment? I don't understand how this commitment fulfillment works. –  CopyrightX May 20 '13 at 2:16
    
I read "Once you've fulfilled your commitment on a new site by asking and answering a few questions, you'll be able to commit to another site. If you are very active, you may be able to re-use your commitment as soon as the second day of public beta. If you aren't active on the site, you won't be able to re-use the commitment until the end of the public beta, or until six months after the beta began." at area51.stackexchange.com/faq#commitment and wonder if anyone can elaborate on when I'll "...be able to re-use the commitment" I foolishly invested in NE. Six months would be painful... –  CopyrightX May 20 '13 at 2:47
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@CopyrightX: there is a reputation requirement as well; you need to actually post stuff folks find useful. –  Shog9 May 22 '13 at 18:29
    
Details? Maybe in a FAQ somewhere? Rather than scattered all over the place? Posting something useful in a group of hundreds of professional L2/L3 Network Engineers is going to be essentially impossible for someone who is not a professional L2/L3 Network Engineer. SE created a closed-group site for this crowd without advance labeling as such. Community Proposal description reads, "Beta Q&A site for network engineers." I'm a network engineer. Just not a professional one. Better description would have been, "Beta Q&A site for L2/L3 professional Network Engineers." I'd never have committed. –  CopyrightX May 22 '13 at 19:49
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@CopyrightX: I'm pretty sure the lack of clear and visible documentation on this is by-design - the intent isn't to give folks a bare minimum threshold to try and scrape by, it's to encourage them to participate on the new site they've committed to participating on. I'll note that in your specific case, most of what you've written hasn't received any votes - so as far as the system is concerned, it's not really doing much. As far as NE knowledge goes, if you're having trouble contributing by answering, why not post a few questions of your own? –  Shog9 May 22 '13 at 19:54
    
Did you check the two questions I did post? Closed or deleted on the way to closure because they were deemed off-topic. Seems that Real Network Engineers don't use Linksys gear. That stuff is contemptible! (Never mind that the name is owned by Cisco.) So the other requirement for contributing useful stuff there is that I own or have access to Cisco routers. Again, woulda been nice to see that in the Community Proposal description before I committed. –  CopyrightX May 22 '13 at 19:59
    
Bottom line, if committing actually means something more than what one explicitly agrees to with, "I commit to participate actively in Community X for at least three months, especially during the private beta, and to ask or answer at least ten questions.", then for Pete's sake, that oughta be explicitly stated. Committing to something nebulous (while under the false impression that commitment requirements are explicitly stated in a written contract) is a near-guarantee of disappointment and disillusionment. I could just join the Scientologists if I wanted that. –  CopyrightX May 22 '13 at 20:20
    
From the Area51 FAQ: If you are very active, you may be able to re-use your commitment as soon as the second day of public beta. If you aren't active on the site, you won't be able to re-use the commitment until the end of the public beta, or until six months after the beta began. Nowhere does it state that 10 posts will immediately satisfy a commitment. To be perfectly honest, if you're signing on to a site without any real interest in the topic beyond doing the bare minimum to get in and get out, we'd rather you didn't bother, @CopyrightX. –  Shog9 May 22 '13 at 20:31
    
So implement an "uncommit" option as so many others have asked for. This proposal was a poor fit for me from Day 1 because the description was fundamentally misleading. Making the requirements for fulfilling a commitment as vague as this only aggravates the problem. Unless you can see something that I cannot see, this experience exposes a fundamental flaw in the software design: how to deal with minorities who (through no fault of their own) are unable to commit in ways that are useful to the majority. –  CopyrightX May 22 '13 at 22:50

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