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How is it possible that my MSO accept rate is 100% when I've only accepted 7 of 10 (now 11) questions? I realize the accept rate on MSO is considered to be completely than on other SE sites but is the calculation different as well?

Sorry if this is a dupe, I searched but the only question tagged with both and is this one which seems to be unrelated.

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Thanks for pointing that out @CodyGray. I hadn't seen that one. –  M.Babcock Mar 18 '12 at 12:56
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1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Accept rate doesn't take into account questions that have no answers (since there's nothing to accept): of the questions on your profile that have no accepted answer, only one has answers.

Additionally, as balpha noted in the comments, only questions that are older than three days count. Since the one question with answers is only a day old, it's not reflected in your accept rate yet.

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It also ignores closed Qs doesn't it? –  Ben Brocka Mar 18 '12 at 0:43
    
Is this true of all SE sites? –  M.Babcock Mar 18 '12 at 0:44
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@M.Babcock Yes. –  user149432 Mar 18 '12 at 0:44
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@BenBrocka As far as I'm aware, that's correct: closed (and deleted) questions don't count. –  user149432 Mar 18 '12 at 0:44
    
@MarkTrapp - Thanks for the explanation. It makes sense, but makes it's a bit confusing (probably even more so with users new to SE). –  M.Babcock Mar 18 '12 at 0:47
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"given it was just asked yesterday and accept rate -- like most metrics -- is cached, that question is not reflected in your total yet" -- Note that (caching or not), it wouldn't be counted before the question is three days old anyway. cc @M.Babcock –  balpha Mar 18 '12 at 7:25
    
@balpha Ah thanks: learn something new every day. –  user149432 Mar 18 '12 at 7:35
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