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Just browsing around and I bumped into an old favorite of mine Practices for programming in a scientific environment? which is clearly a "make-a-list" question and therefore off-topic by modern standards.

It is, however,

  • From the very early days of the site (beta I think).
  • Fairly highly voted, and has received 3k views and has been active from time to time after it was initially asked (though not for a year now).
  • Possessed of a number of answered that have many of the "good subjective" qualities and at least 10 votes. The question itself is marginal on the good-subjective/bad-subjective scale, but a significant fraction of the answers treated the questions that should have been asked.

Full disclosure: I am biased as I participated in that thread.

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Asked on Sep 1 '08, good answers (and some great ones), not a single typically bad answer and still open. The historical lock was implemented as a compromise, and more often than not I don't see the "historical significance" of the locked questions, but this one is definitely a gem of the past I'd want to keep around. –  Yannis Apr 3 '12 at 18:32
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That's such a high-quality question, and has attracted such useful answers, that it hasn't even been closed yet. –  Cody Gray Apr 3 '12 at 18:47

2 Answers 2

Possessed of a number of answered that have many of the "good subjective" qualities and at least 10 votes. The question itself is marginal on the good-subjective/bad-subjective scale, but a significant fraction of the answers treated the questions that should have been asked.

This isn't really a good reason to lock it. It's a good reason not to close it.

Therefore, I suggest you refrain from closing it.

So far as I can see, it isn't off-topic, out of date, or particularly controversial. If it gets closed simply because you brought it up here, it'll probably get re-opened again quickly - if not, flag for moderator attention.

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Personally, I say no (assuming it was even closed):

  • 3k views is nothing compared to some of the other questions that are out there that people are linking to/find resourceful but aren't appropriate for SO.
  • I (respectfully) disagree with the "fairly highly voted" designation. Eric Lippert gets 74 votes just for eating lunch on a Tuesday afternoon. Jon Skeet hits the rep cap with the first breath he takes in a day (I know they don't ask questions, but it's just to provide some scale).
  • Given that this is from the fairly early days of the site, the above two metrics should be much higher given the amount of time that's passed to indicate to me that this is something that needs a historical lock.

I agree with the assessment of the good-subjective/bad-subjective criteria, but I don't think that alone is enough to give it one.

I mean, it's not like 3K unique views makes it a pillar of the Internet. Another reason that historical locks exist is to not break pages that have a massive amount of incoming links to them. If there were a tremendous number of links to that page, one would assume the view count would be much higher for an almost three-year-old question.

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Additionally, it's not heavily linked. While we dive into this 'what should be preserved' stuff, that's something we have to consider. "What else breaks if this goes away for the majority of our visitors?" Barring policy, unfortunately, it's still up to us to make that call. I'm a little annoyed at that, because we're the ones that deal with a lack of policy until they figure it out. –  Tim Post Apr 3 '12 at 19:24
    
@TimPost Interesting, I was typing that up just as you posted your comment. –  casperOne Apr 3 '12 at 19:26
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By virtue of no stats (analytics) to see the referrers per question, all these "famed" questions have no incoming links –  random Apr 3 '12 at 20:14

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