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As a trusted user on SO, one of my privileges is

Voting to delete answers with score of -1 or lower

Add to this the fact that votes can be withdrawn within a grace period, and it's possible for me to do this:

  1. See a 'bad' answer with a score of zero
  2. Downvote it
  3. Refresh the page
  4. Vote to delete it
  5. Withdraw my downvote

Thus achieving what it would seem the privilege is specifically not granting me, namely the ability to cast delete votes on zero-scoring answers. After the above actions, the answer has a score of zero, but does still have my vote-to-delete on it (downvoting again and refreshing shows delete(1)).

How OK / not-OK is it for me to do this?

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@thirtydot: I think he meant more the "I have the privilege to delete-vote -1 scored questions, but see, I can do it with 0 scored questions, too!" thingy... –  Time Traveling Bobby Jun 8 '12 at 11:55
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@GardenGnobobby: I agree. I linked to it mainly as an example of another "downvote exploit". –  thirtydot Jun 8 '12 at 12:06
    
No exploit; it's no different than editing a post for the mere reason of undoing a vote. You should not do it, but it's neither a loophole nor exploit of the system. –  Shadow Wizard Nov 1 '12 at 8:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

There's no point to that. Once the deletion goes through, all the rep lost from downvoting the question will be restored.

Even worse, by un-downvoting the question, you're making it hard for others to vote to delete as well. Since you obviously want the question gone, this is rather counterproductive, yes?

Yeah, you can "exploit" this. But not to any worthwhile end.

Oh, and let's not forget: you have to have 20K rep to vote to delete. If you honestly still care about that -1 (especially since it's temporary), well that's a deep, personal issue about which there's nothing we can (or should) do.

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