What is meta? ×
Meta Stack Exchange is where users like you discuss bugs, features, and support issues that affect the software powering all 134 Stack Exchange communities.

I recently went to apply to a job by the title of "web developer" on Careers.Stackoverflow.com and when I went to upload my HTML resume, I got an error that it's not allowed.

I really try to prove that I know HTML and CSS with my HTML resume. It covers edge cases such as printing the exact same way as it looks on the screen and such.

I think that converting my HTML resume to a PDF would actually hurt my chances of getting the job because they can't immediately know I know HTML and CSS well and can do web design.

I really do not understand the reasoning behind not allowing HTML resumes though.

Is there someone who can explain why they don't allow them, or if there is some technical limitation to them or what?

share|improve this question
    
Just a hunch: if I would name it "See what the community thinks of this user" and then make the content look like an official Careers page? (Still then, I can see why it might be useful.) –  Arjan Jun 21 '12 at 5:24
2  
I'm pretty sure you're requesting a security vunerablity –  Some Helpful Commenter Jun 21 '12 at 5:35
    
@SomeHelpfulCommenter Well, right now what I usually end up doing is finding the job posting on stackoverflow and then looking on the companies website for an email address. I'm sure this isn't their intended flow, and I'm pretty sure that there have been more doc, docx, and pdf vulnerabilities than html vulnerabilities. –  Earlz Jun 21 '12 at 5:41
1  
I assume @SomeHelpfulCommenter is referring to including JavaScript in your HTML, and then have that loaded from the same Careers domain, which might allow for accessing other Careers pages as if you were the other user. (It wouldn't be too nice if your JavaScript could reveal which employer is peeking into your profile. Worse if it would fool the other user into doing some actions.) –  Arjan Jun 21 '12 at 5:52
    
@Arjan Easily defeated. Just have resumes loaded from an alternate domain and/or have the mime-type set though that any sane browser will "download" the resume rather than view it –  Earlz Jun 21 '12 at 5:59
    
Sure, Earl, I think you're right. –  Arjan Jun 21 '12 at 6:12

1 Answer 1

The number of people who actually apply to jobs by sending an html file through email is very low. In the case that people do want to show their html and css chops, they typically create a profile for themselves somewhere on a webpage and link that web page directly from the cover letter.

share|improve this answer
4  
Also, your resume is not your portfolio. –  Wooble Jun 21 '12 at 13:17
    
@Wooble of course it's not. But I thought it was quite common for anyone applying for a job like web developer to have an HTML resume. I guess I overestimated how many people use HTML for resumes –  Earlz Jun 21 '12 at 20:01
    
Also though. I don't understand why you would disallow HTML resumes. It's obviously a heard of format and such, and there isn't really any drawbacks to allowing them –  Earlz Jun 21 '12 at 20:02
2  
@Earlz The drawback to every feature you ever implement is called maintenance. –  Nick Larsen Jun 21 '12 at 22:31
    
This doesn't answer the question! –  martin f Feb 24 at 18:39

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .