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I had a scenario where I answered a question and I found some improvement to the answer and edited it to give the improvements. So the answer appeared with the

Answer posted time and the edited time.

Suppose if I am deciding to remove my change on the answer and roll it back to the first version, then the answer status shows me like:

Edited just now and Answered at:Version1 time

My question is if I am rolling back to my oldest version then the edit time should be removed right? As the content which appears now is posted right at the beginning?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A rollback is an edit. It changes the content of the post. So if the content is A in the first ten minutes, then B for ten minutes, and then A again, then hiding the edit time would mean pretending that the change to B never took place.

But the history of a post should be very public, and it should be obvious that things have changed. Imagine I see your post B, like it, and vote it up. Then you roll back to A, which says something entirely different and utterly wrong.

Since there's no "edited" time on the post, everyone else will assume that content A has been upvoted.

And that's why even in your scenario, there will be an "edited" time stamp.

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This really makes sense.. But my issue was about the age of the current content. Like the post after rollback is not fresh, but the oldest. And it says edited just now. –  mithunsatheesh Jul 4 '12 at 6:13
2  
While that is true, by rolling back you're making the content fresh -- as in "I'm giving this content my blessing right now." If you didn't agree with the content anymore, you wouldn't roll back to it and make it the post's current content. –  balpha Jul 4 '12 at 6:16
    
thanks bro.. that was helpful.... –  mithunsatheesh Jul 4 '12 at 6:18

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