What is meta? ×
Meta Stack Exchange is where users like you discuss bugs, features, and support issues that affect the software powering all 127 Stack Exchange communities.

I understand that the badge is not currently awarded for self-accepts, as noted in a comment by Jeff here. I don't really understand why this is.

If the concern is that someone would favor their own answer over that of someone else, it would seem that that is offset by the fact that the post must have a score of 10 or more.

If the concern is that the user would just copy the content from another post to get the badge, then either the question is a duplicate, or this is impossible, as only the first post that was posted as an answer can get the badge.

Especially with this blog post, it seems that creating a canonical answer is a good thing. Why should the person that created such a thing be precluded from getting the enlightened badge?

As such, I would appreciate an explanation for the current state of things, and also request that it be changed.

Disclaimer: I do stand to get the badge from this post.

share|improve this question
    
Let's turn that around: any user that can't figure out how to answer his own question in a second or less should lose all of his Enlightened badges. –  Uphill Luge Jul 4 '12 at 20:26
3  
@UphillLuge, Where are you coming from? –  soandos Jul 4 '12 at 20:29
    
I suspect that CW answers are not eligible either. Your Superuser Q & A are both CW posts. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 4 '12 at 20:34
6  
Odd that this isn't obvious to you. An Enlightened badge encourages fast answers that are accurate enough to be popular. Clearly a user that answers his own question won't have any trouble with the fast part. Surely, and hopefully, he'll take a while to write an answer. A week ought to be typical. Then post the question, immediately followed by a post of the answer. Taking a week to answer the question isn't enlightened by a mile. –  Uphill Luge Jul 4 '12 at 20:57
8  
Badges...it's like the fracking Boy Scouts around here... –  skinnyTOD Jul 4 '12 at 21:45
1  
The Self-Learner badge is for when you answer your own question and get upvotes on it. –  JimmyPena Jul 5 '12 at 0:18
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I disagree.

But maybe there could be a badge for a self accept with 10+ score. We could call it Rubber Duck like the moments of wisdom that appear if you explain the problem in detail to another person/object.

share|improve this answer
4  
I like the "Rubber Duck" idea. :3 –  iglvzx Jul 4 '12 at 20:46
    
Why not make this a new suggested-feature proposal? –  Martijn Pieters Jul 4 '12 at 20:52
    
interesting technique, first time I hear of it. I hope it works with my cat (as he is not an inanimate object) –  ajax333221 Jul 4 '12 at 21:10
add comment

How enlightened are you really, when you post a question to which you already know the answer? You could have the answer all written up, post it together with the question, before anyone can start reading your question, and perhaps rake in the upvotes.

You have foreknowledge of your question being posted. As such you are excluded from the speculative race towards being the first to post a great answer to it.

share|improve this answer
3  
Are you aware that you can post an answer at the same time you post the question by design? There's a check box at the bottom: "Answer your own question – share your knowledge, Q&A-style" –  Erwin Brandstetter Jul 4 '12 at 20:23
1  
@ErwinBrandstetter: Shows you how often I post a question on a SE site myself. Corrected. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 4 '12 at 20:25
2  
True, @Erwin, but that also gives one a false headstart to match "First to answer and accepted with at least 10 upvotes" –  Arjan Jul 4 '12 at 20:25
    
@Arjan: No argument about that, just setting the facts straight .. –  Erwin Brandstetter Jul 4 '12 at 20:26
    
(Indeed, you're right, @Erwin.) –  Arjan Jul 4 '12 at 20:26
    
@Arjan, I would agree that it might be easier to get the enlightened badge if you use the built in checkbox to answer your own question, but that does not make it any less valuable. And as to not being enlightened, the word means (or can mean anyway) "Having or showing a rational, modern, and well-informed outlook." That has nothing to do with speed. –  soandos Jul 4 '12 at 20:28
add comment

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .