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I recently answered a question, and in my answer I had a code sample. I came into the office this morning to find that my answer was modified. I was more than a little annoyed because it was marked as "code indentation" which isn't true, the code was actually changed, and as a result my answer was no longer accurate. Luckily my answer had already been accepted. Besides that, it's bad for the site to have inaccurate answers because someone wanted 2 points.

Since I was the author of the post shouldn't there be a way for me to revert the change? I didn't see anything obvious, I had to manually change it by retyping the code sample.

Also it would be nice to have some sort of recourse, even if it's just the ability to leave a comment to the moderators that accepted the edit and the person that made the edit explaining why the edit was not acceptable. Does this exist and I'm just not seeing it as well?

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Perhaps I'm missing something, but I fail to see how the edit in question changed the semantics of your code sample. What's wrong with the edit specifically? It made the string in your code much easier to read since it eliminated some horizontal scrolling. –  eldarerathis Aug 6 '12 at 16:26
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No, it split the string with + which is just dumb to do inside a string.Format() and made my comments about it inaccurate. –  Nathan Aug 6 '12 at 16:31
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The edit only improved the formatting and as such did not change the meaning of the answer. –  Toon Krijthe Aug 6 '12 at 16:31
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It did not improve the formatting, it changed the code. In c# strings are immutable, concatenating multiple strings is a waste of resources. Grr... I feel like you guys are avoiding my actual question. –  Nathan Aug 6 '12 at 16:35
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Others could argue that having 270+ characters on a single line is "dumb" (it certainly exceeds the right margin of VS's editor on my 1080p monitor). C# also optimizes the concatenation of string literals (see stackoverflow.com/a/288802/390989 for example). This may seem like it's obviating the point of your question, but the reason I ask is because your rollback made the answer much harder to read and there was no obvious reason for that and you did not explain it. If that's your reason then so be it, I won't say anything further. –  eldarerathis Aug 6 '12 at 16:37
    
@eldarerathis I did not know about that C# optimization, thank you. I admit I feel sheepish now, for that and that I missed the glaringly obvious rollback link. –  Nathan Aug 6 '12 at 16:44
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I would've rolled that back as well, but... edited to prefix the string with @ and then split the sql statement string over several lines with some nice indentation. The + signs are hellishly distracting. –  Kev Aug 6 '12 at 17:03
    
@Kev While I agree that looks much nicer, and I would've written it that way were it my own code, that is actually changing the semantics of the code. You're adding whitespace into the string itself, rather than in the code surrounding it. Here it's a SQL string in which the newlines will be ignored anyway, but that isn't always the case. (It also potentially involves lots of whitespace being sent over the wire.) The edit done to the OPs post will actually result in the same code being run, which is what makes it a valid edit. –  Servy Aug 6 '12 at 18:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since I was the author of the post shouldn't there be a way for me to revert the change? I didn't see anything obvious, I had to manually change it by retyping the code sample.

Just click the edited [some time] ago link below your answer, scroll down to the last proper revision and click the rollback link.

Also it would be nice to have some sort of recourse, even if it's just the ability to leave a comment to the moderators that accepted the edit and the person that made the edit explaining why the edit was not acceptable. Does this exist and I'm just not seeing it as well?

Revision owners are notified when using @replies in comments (source). That lets you notify the user who suggested the edit simply by posting a comment:

@username: Your edit was invalid, because ...

As far as I know, there's no such way of notifying the user(s) who accepted the edit.

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Thanks for the reply but it looks like the rollback link only appears if I made the edit? It's not there on the accepted edit. –  Nathan Aug 6 '12 at 16:31
    
You have to click the rollback on the last proper revision (1), not the current one. –  Dennis Aug 6 '12 at 16:33
    
I'll keep that in mind. I'm not sure if I agree about commenting on the answer as it doesn't really apply to the general public. –  Nathan Aug 6 '12 at 16:37
    
Most comments don't. Every interaction between regular users is public on SE, even the "private" chat rooms. –  Dennis Aug 6 '12 at 16:42
    
Good point, thanks for answering my question! –  Nathan Aug 6 '12 at 16:46
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Just remember the username of who edited (or proposed an edit for a) post is not autocompleted, when you write it. –  kiamlaluno Aug 6 '12 at 17:16

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