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There's the pretty widely used tag.

And then there's the slightly lesser user .

In my opinion those two are exactly the same, but I don't have the score to suggest a synonym.

One question is where to take the Tag Wiki from. They both have reasonably complete tag wikis that are similar but not identical (personally I find the one from a little bit more informative, but that's probably because I'm a sucker for hyperlinks).

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There are 2 contexts in which "hash" is used 1) Cryptographic hashing (and related hash functions) 2) Hash table. Do we need to disambiguate the 2 meanings? –  nhahtdh Sep 5 '12 at 16:08
    
The plural of the two tags clearly has the superior wiki. –  Lix Sep 5 '12 at 16:08
    
@nhahtdh: there's cryptographichashfunction which should probably be renamed to cryptographic-hash. Both of those uses share common properties, so I think a shared tag (together with more specific tags, where appropriate) is the correct solution. –  Joachim Sauer Sep 5 '12 at 16:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The tag excerpts used from the tags are the following:

A hash function is any well-defined procedure or mathematical function that converts a large amount of data into a small datum, usually a single integer.

Hashing is a mathematical operation which generates a fixed length "signature" or "hash value" characteristic of some input data. Hashes are used in cryptography, lookup tables, passwords, as checksums, data validation, data comparison, and many other uses.

Both the tags are thought to be used for the same purpose, apparently.
is not used to mean the result of the operation of hashing; even if that would be the meaning (which is not what the tag wiki says), I don't think there is the need to make a distinguish between the result of the operation, and the operation itself.

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