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What qualifies a question as an official FAQ?

For example, this question has an answer with twelve votes, but no accepted answers, and no founders weighing in.

The answer refers to the FAQ on StackOverflow (which was migrated here), but when you try and click on the authoritative link (describing the format for marking posts duplicate), it loops back to this answer.

Which means that the answer is citing itself as a source.

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Note that the current process for creating and proposing FAQs is listed in the FAQ index. –  Gnome Apr 7 '10 at 5:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The tag is a bit antiquated. A FAQ is considered official when it's tagged . This is a moderator-only tag, so if you find a question that you think deserves it, flag it for moderator attention and, if we agree, we'll add the tag.

In order to speed up the process, the proposed FAQ question should be Community Wiki and should have a thorough, well-written answer that's accepted as the official answer. This isn't a hard and fast rule, but the idea of a FAQ is that it's a community-owned, community-editable resource. Here is an example of a good FAQ.

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+1 for me being unaware of this change. –  TheTXI Aug 16 '09 at 23:42
    
Very helpful. I did not realize this was an official change. (lol!) –  Rex M Aug 16 '09 at 23:44
    
Indeed, the question I cited does in fact have the FAQ tag on it, and I guess the ruby red color indicates a moderator tag. Thanks. –  Robert Harvey Aug 16 '09 at 23:57
    
@Robert: I just retagged it –  Kyle Cronin Aug 17 '09 at 0:00
    
Thank you, I did not know this either. –  Troggy Aug 17 '09 at 7:26
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Is the rule that a FAQ question should be CW still applicable? –  Charles Stewart Dec 22 '10 at 20:01

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