What is meta? ×
Meta Stack Exchange is where users like you discuss bugs, features, and support issues that affect the software powering all 133 Stack Exchange communities.

A newbie is asking for some codez. What can I cite in support of unwillingness to provide it?

share|improve this question
3  
You can cite What StackOverflow is not. Oh wait a second... –  GSerg Oct 1 '12 at 18:53
    
You can provide citations with the Downvote Arrow and Flag/Vote to Close. –  user7116 Oct 1 '12 at 18:54
1  
When we refer to a question as a send me the codez question, it's generally not meant as any question asking for code. It is specifically referring to questions that haven't demonstrated any attempt at solving the problem, haven't spent much time/effort in creating their actual question (poor grammar, little explanations, not properly formatted, etc.), are clearly uninterested in understanding any answers, and are asking for code to solve an entire problem, as opposed to some more specific, narrow problem that came up in the course of solving the larger "actual" problem. –  Servy Oct 1 '12 at 18:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The "Do your homework" section of the "How to Ask" page is what I usually refer to in combination with a message which explains some of it. That is, I don't just post the bare link.

share|improve this answer

Users of Stack Exchange sites are expected to demonstrate that they've attempted to do some basic research before asking their question. This is described in "How to Ask":

Sharing your research helps everyone. Tell us what you found and why it didn’t meet your needs. This demonstrates that you’ve taken the time to try to help yourself, it saves us from reiterating obvious answers, and most of all it helps you get a more specific and relevant answer!

On Stack Overflow, this generally means that you should attempt to write some code first, since failing to do so is akin to not demonstrating sufficient prior research effort.

Note that the tooltip over the downvote button for the question includes the verbiage: "This question doesn't show any research effort."

share|improve this answer

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .