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I voted to close a question yesterday, in the "Close Votes" queue.

Then, when going over the new "Review Reopen Votes", I saw that question again. The question had not been edited, it was unchanged.

I feel it's better that the reopen votes are reviewed by different people than those who voted to close in the first place, at least when the question is not edited. Somewhat akin to the "four-eyes principle".

So, I suggest that questions that have been closed, do no show up in the Reopen Review queue of the closers, at least until they have been edited.

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I was just thinking about this! –  Yannis Oct 17 '12 at 11:20
    
This just happened to me. I thought it was kind of silly, I agree with you –  durron597 Dec 16 '12 at 4:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This change is live now:

If you voted to close a post, and it hasn't been edited since the time it was closed, then you won't see that post in the Reopen Queue.

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Why not? It's perfectly possible that maybe you'll read a comment someone has posted that made you realize that this question in fact isn't close-worthy, and you might want to vote to reopen it to correct your mistake. I've done this quite a few times, although without the aide of a reopen review task.

If it's anything like it's counterpart, it'll take 5 "leave closed" reviews in order to kick it out of the queue, so 4 other people would have to agree with you in order for that to happen. What's the big deal? If it hasn't been edited and should be closed, then there's nothing wrong with you saying "no, this really should be closed."

I'm sure checking to see if the question was edited since you voted to close it would be a lot more effort (concerning resources) than the feature is worth.

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What you're describing, albeit possible, is extremely rare. And if there are comments that point out the question shouldn't be closed, more often than not these comments (or part of) should be incorporated in the question (which would count as an edit, obviously). It's not really a big deal, but why ask me to review a question that I already have an opinion on (expressed via my close vote) when the chance of my opinion changing is extremely small? Why not let a completely different set of eyes review the question? –  Yannis Oct 17 '12 at 12:14
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You say there are four others reviewing the same post, but what if all five of the people voting to leave it closed were the exact five that voted to close it in the first place? –  Servy Oct 17 '12 at 14:15

I agree: you're essentially being asked to review your own actions, which is a form of conflict of interest. In fact, I think that's the case even if the post has been edited, because humans are not impartial creatures - your past experience with the question will color your future reactions to it, no matter how hard you try to be "fair".

Especially given the fact that the review queues are not suffering for participants, I think the original close-voters on a question should not see it in the reopen queue.

This could perhaps be expanded to the other review queues as well: for example, someone who has posted an answer to a question shouldn't be asked to review close votes on it (and in the rare case of a question that has been closed and then reopened, none of the [up to 10] previous voters should see it in any queue).

Edit: this answer on a related question implies that my suggestion is already the case for the close vote and delete queues, so it seems like it might just be an oversight that the same functionality wasn't implemented for the reopen queue.

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Regarding your edit, that is not related. That's making it not show it in the close votes queue if you've already voted to close or delete it, because you can only ever cast one close vote and one reopen vote on a single question. Showing it to you again would be pointless, since you can't take action on it, by design. –  animuson Dec 16 '12 at 5:58

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