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There are several hats with the requirements of X upvoted answers/questions. For example, "15 upvoted questions" for the Brunhilde hat.

These are ambiguous. It could be read as "upvote 15 questions" or "ask 15 questions that get upvoted." I thought it was the former! Clicking the hat gives a more detailed description but I thought I would point out this ambiguity.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I think you can eliminate the ambiguity by mentally putting I Haz in front of the description, as in "I haz 15 upvoted questions" or "I haz rep cap."

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i have both 15 up voted answer and 1 answer with 15 up vote but haven't got that hat ... i want that hat ... –  NullPoiиteя Dec 19 '12 at 4:03
    
Ya know, there should be a rep cap (I'm thinking propeller beanie) -- the user with the most rep gain to date is eligible to wear it or something :-) –  voretaq7 Dec 19 '12 at 4:14
    
i have reached rep cap 16 time but haven't got those rep cap hat ... –  NullPoiиteя Dec 19 '12 at 4:34
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@NullPointer: the hats are not awarded retroactively (except for L'chaim). This means, for example, that you need to hit the rep cap some time between now and Jan 4th to get "Just Jesting" hat - it doesn't matter how many times you've already done it in the past. –  Mac Dec 19 '12 at 5:35

I think it's clear, because there's a difference between "5 upvoted answers" and "upvoted 5 answers" and an implicit assumption that it applies to you.

In "5 upvoted answers", the word upvoted is in the position for an adjective, so you have 5 answers that were upvoted.

In "upvoted 5 answers" it's in the position of a verb, so you upvoted 5 answers.

If you want it ambiguous, you should phrase it "5 answers upvoted"!

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