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I recently wished to learn about assembly redirects for unsigned assemblies in .Net. I found that someone had asked the exact question that I wished to be answered on SO, however this question had very few views and zero answers.

The question was, in my opinion, well written and clear. Rather than ask a duplicate question, I simply awarded a bounty on the question to try to drum up some interest. Obviously I continued to research the issue and eventually found the answer. The following day, I posted the answer to the question and the OP has accepted as an answer, however there is no option to award the bounty to myself.

Will the bounty just expire and disappear into the ether?

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Ether is scientifically obsolete btw. Einstein and Maxwell showed that long back. –  AsheeshR Dec 27 '12 at 3:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Unless another answer shows up that you consider worthy of the bounty, yes it will just disappear. You can't award a bounty to yourself and the reputation is paid up front regardless of whether the bounty is awarded.

You can read more about how bounties work here.

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Will the bounty just expire and disappear into the ether?

Yes, if there are no other answers posted with 2 or more upvotes during the bounty period, it will be disappeared(Answer with 2 or more upvotes during this period will get half the bounty score). You cant assign bounty to yourself. If the OP has accepted your answer, then the bounty will be completely lost without awarding to anyone.

According to my understanding, basically the intention is to reward good answers posted by others during this period. If there is an option to assign it yourself, there is a chance that people might misuse that feature to get the rep back.

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