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I asked a question about chroots and Java and someone answered with a short answer that gave me ideas on how to do what I wanted to do. I later asked a related question on AskUbuntu. No one answered, but I came up with a working solution which I used to answer my question there.

Should I ask the aforesaid person on StackOverflow who gave me ideas to include more information (maybe from my AskUbuntu answer), just accept his answer as it is, or should I add a new answer, possibly thanking the original person for his ideas? Thanks!

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If there is an existing answer that helped you out, you could also edit the person's answer who helped you and add the missing details, then you could accept that person's answer to further show appreciation.

If your edits would change the answer too much, then you could do what Mistu4u suggests, and post your own answer. However, you should cite the other answer in your post and give proper attribution.

Just know that, in this case, if you accept your own answer, you don't get the +2 reputation for accepting an answer, and you don't get the +15 for your answer being accepted, so if at all possible, I'd try to edit first so that the person who helped you gets credit.

On AskUbuntu, a self answer is the way to go hands down, since there are no other answers; however, you could still cite the other answer on Stack Overflow and give credit where credit is due.

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The best possible way is you answer the question you asked, if the answer actually answers properly and completely the question. You can thank the person who answered the first to your question if his ideas proved to be handy to you. If not, there is no need to thank him. Just answer your question. For your note, it is perfectly okay practice in StackExchange to answer your own question. Check this blog entry for insight into it.

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