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I post a question and I get fairly good number of answers. I am not completely satisfied with the best answer I have got. But, yet if I mark that answer as accepted, am I reducing the chance of getting more or better answers for that question?

Or put the other way, when I mark an answer as accepted, am I reducing the chance of my question being active?

Knowing these things, I can be a better Stack Overflow user.

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(Please note the edits Mat made. Thanks!) –  Arjan Jan 19 '13 at 9:35
    
Why do you tag your question with feature-request on Meta even it is not a feature-request? You also did the same on your previous post. –  hims056 Jan 19 '13 at 9:38
    
@hims056 Please go ahead and edit it, if I am wrong. I dont see any similar tags other than this. ofc, to change this existing feature is also a feature request, this is my understanding. :) –  Sibi Jan 19 '13 at 9:47
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@Sibi What "change" are you talking about? You're just asking whether or not you might get new answers after you've accepted an answer. And the answer is "yes, you might". That's not a feature-request. If you want to change something, clarify what that is. –  Bart Jan 19 '13 at 9:49
    
Ok guys. I ve edited the tag. –  Sibi Jan 19 '13 at 9:50

5 Answers 5

Once you accept an answer, new answers can still be added. The likelihood might decrease, because the question has been marked as answered after all. But there's nothing stopping that from happening.

Then again, there's no need to accept an answer if you're not entirely satisfied with it.

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People looking for new questions to answer (just to earn some quick rep) might skip questions with selected answers.

On the other hand, people really into the subject will probably read it to check out any interesting answers. If they find that the existing answers are not that good or perhaps a bit incomplete, they might very well try to add a better one.

Accepting an answer is not a final decision. You can very well change your mind when a new answer appears, and select that instead. It happens occasionally.

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Leave a comment on the accepted answer that indicates what you are still longing for. Maybe that person will supply it. Maybe someone else will leave another answer that supplies it.

p.s. I've done a quick review of your questions on stackoverflow.com, and I'm wondering what which one you are referring to. Those that have answers looks like they have rather definitive answers.

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commenting is the way to go. –  bool.dev Jan 20 '13 at 6:56

My personal impression is that indeed accepting an answer reduces the number of views: the random and casual SO user will most likely skip questions that have already accepted their answer.

However, as Bo Persson, noted these questions might still be viewed by non-casual user who are particularly interested in the subject. These users may provide better than casual answers to your question.

Therefore, my advice is:

  1. If you are not satisfied with the answers you got - do not accept them. However, do leave comments to indicate the users that you care and appreciate their effort.

  2. Upvoting is nice - even if an answer is not perfect you can still upvote it.

  3. Give your question an informative title and accurate tags: this way you'll reach for user who are non-casual viewers and increase your chances of getting good answers.

Good luck

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Usually, the answers stop completely (or almost completely) when one is accepted. If you're not satisfied and want more answers, you can wait for more or offer a bounty.

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That's a supposition; and not a particularly accurate one... –  ben is uǝq backwards Jan 19 '13 at 16:49
    
Is that query for votes or answers? Are a quarter of the SO answers posted after one is already accepted? –  xpda Jan 19 '13 at 16:56

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