What is meta? ×
Meta Stack Exchange is where users like you discuss bugs, features, and support issues that affect the software powering all 131 Stack Exchange communities.

I wrote a post on SO that seems to have been migrated to Code Review without my request or authorization:

Naive C++ Matrix Multiplication 100 times slower than BLAS?

Is there anyway to determine as the posts author who migrated it (or who voted it to be migrated)?

I don't really care, it got answered - but there was contention over whether it belonged on SO or CR as you can see in the comments - so I'm just curious as to what happened?

Can one moderator just make a unilateral decision and action a migration? Or were there multiple votes involved?

share|improve this question
2  
Note: Technically you don't have the ability to authorize (or forbid) migrations and they can be done without your request. –  casperOne Jan 28 '13 at 15:26
1  
@casperOne: There are six upvotes on a comment that explicitly says that we don't think it should be migrated and there was only one person that voted for it to be migrated. In my opinion your decision was dubious, but as I said, I don't really care. –  Andrew Tomazos Jan 28 '13 at 15:39
    
See first comment. Performance is on topic for Code Review. See their FAQ - codereview.stackexchange.com/faq. –  casperOne Jan 28 '13 at 15:44
    
@casperOne: "Is it actual code from a project rather than pseudo-code or example code?" It's example code. –  Andrew Tomazos Jan 28 '13 at 15:54
    
As long as the code is complete, and compiles, it fulfills that requirement. –  casperOne Jan 28 '13 at 15:59
1  
@casperOne: See new comment in post: "Why on earth was this migrated here?" - as I said, bad call. –  Andrew Tomazos Jan 29 '13 at 6:29
    
We can un migrate stuff. There's little that's un reversible in this situation. Monday-morning quarterbacking doesn't effect any of these changes though, just saying. –  casperOne Jan 29 '13 at 8:13
    
@casperOne: :) Sorry, I'm just being a mean old grump. Do what you think is best. –  Andrew Tomazos Jan 29 '13 at 8:52
    
It should be resolved in the next few hours, I'll check up on it when I can. –  casperOne Jan 29 '13 at 9:40
    
@casperOne As long as the code is complete, and compiles, it fulfills that requirement. Questions about complete and compilable code may also fufill SO requirements. The point is that it is an objective question about the code and not a request for a subjective review of it. And only one non-mod person voted otherwise... –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 30 '13 at 3:44
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit "Which key optimizations to the C++ algorithm could get it on par with the BLAS version?" Um, that's exactly what Code Review was made for. –  casperOne Jan 30 '13 at 3:47
    
@casperOne No, the question was, "Why does my implementation suck?" or "Why is A faster than B?" The latter being exactly the type of question that I like to answer on SO. –  Mysticial Jan 30 '13 at 3:49
    
@casperOne: That bit is. All of the rest is not. Can anyone explain this difference? What exactly is the architecture of the BLAS implementation? I see it is calling fortran, but what is happening at the CPU level? What algorithm is it using? How is it using the CPU caches? What x86-64 machine instructions does it call? (Is it using advanced CPU features like AVX?) Where does it get this extra speed from? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 30 '13 at 3:49
    
Full disclosure: I think it should be on SO but I think it should be closed since it has about five million sub-questions –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 30 '13 at 3:50
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: Your opinion is ludicrous. There was not one vote to close on SO after 500 views, the quesiton had 10 upvotes and 4 followers. The "subquestions" are all elaborations on the central theme which is why is A 100 times faster than B. A totally concrete question with a well researched background given. Exactly the sort of stuff that should be on SO. –  Andrew Tomazos Jan 30 '13 at 7:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Can one moderator just make a unilateral decision and action a migration? Or were there multiple votes involved?

Regular close voters can vote to close a question, or choose from a limited set of sites to migrate it to. Code Review is not an available migration path on Stack Overflow, however, so only a moderator may migrate a question to that site. A moderator's close/migrate vote is always binding (i.e. it overrides all others).

You can find out who performed the migration by scrolling to the bottom of your question where it was moved to, and clicking the origin site name:

migrated from stackoverflow.com

Which brings you to the original page, where you can see at the bottom who migrated it:

migrated to codereview.stackexchange.com by Luchian Grigore, casperOne♦

That said, a migration can be rejected; this involves closing the question on the destination site, which unlocks it on the originating site allowing it to be reopened if appropriate. However this depends on what happens to the question on the destination site.

share|improve this answer

It says:

migrated from stackoverflow.com 1 hour ago

below the question on the target site. Clicking on the link takes you back to the original question, where it says:

migrated to codereview.stackexchange.com by Luchian Grigore, casperOne♦ 1 hour ago

Of these "Luchian Grigore" voted to close(he can't vote for migration to code-review since it's not in the list), and "casperOne" as a diamond mod migrated it.

share|improve this answer

If you view the mirgation stub on Stack Overflow, you can see who closed it as off-topic.

Posts can be closed/migrated either by 5 users with enough reputation to close a quesiton (3k), by a single moderator, or by some combination (once a moderator votes to close, the question gets closed, whether there are no close votes already or 4).

In the case of your quesiton, the close notice reads:

migrated to codereview.stackexchange.com by Luchian Grigore, casperOne♦ 1 hour ago

share|improve this answer

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .