Meta Stack Exchange is where users like you discuss bugs, features, and support issues that affect the software powering all 157 Stack Exchange communities.

What is meta?
Here's how it works:
  1. Any Stack Exchange user can ask a question
  2. The community provides support, votes on ideas, and reports bugs
  3. Your voice helps shape the way Stack Exchange operates

Because changing the current @username from @userid (atleast internally) can reflect the changed username / handle easily.

share|improve this question
    
Self answering works in a differnt way. In the question part you write your question and you add an answer below in the Your Answer section – rekire Jan 30 '13 at 11:10
    
I mean, at least in the background they can be based on userid so that they won't break when user changes his username – TheWhiteRabbit Jan 30 '13 at 11:15
1  
@TechExchange nothing breaks, the @ cause single notification to be sent once the comment was submitted, that's it. It has no further purpose. If the name later changes you just see @ followed by the old name but that does not break anything. What I mean is that it's not meant to act as "in reply to a certain comment". – Shadow Wizard Jan 30 '13 at 11:16
    
Well, I love the fact that username changes get archived that way. – Time Traveling Bobby Jan 30 '13 at 11:17
    
If there is some communication like as @ xxx mentioned and @ xxx changed to @yyy , meaning is broken isn't it – TheWhiteRabbit Jan 30 '13 at 11:18
1  
@SulfurizedDemonbobby indeed, I often use this to track down deleted accounts to find out who it was! :) – Shadow Wizard Jan 30 '13 at 11:18

It's not that they can't, more so that they won't, and here's two reasons why, I think:

  • Comments are secondary citizens and often noise, in danger of deletion with no real posterity held,
  • and, given the above, it makes the extra overhead of doing so overkill.

There are other reasons, but mainly, considering them all together, there's no added value.

share|improve this answer

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .