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I have seen a couple of Review Audits for First Posts and Late Answers. They are very easy to by-pass.

While reviewing a First Post or a Late Answer, I obviously expect them to be posted very recently (maximum of about 30 minutes ago on Stack Overflow; maximum of about 3-4 hours ago on Ask Ubuntu and similarly on other sites based on different parameters).

However, all the audits I have seen for First Posts and Late Answers (on Stack Overflow) had a timestamp of about 15-20 days earlier. So, the Review Audits are pretty easy to by-pass if a reviewer keeps a watch on timestamp alone.

See one example each for First Post and Late Answer:


Note to Reviewers: You have forgot whatever you read just now!!! Whoosh!!

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2  
I have forgot whatever I read just now... Damn Hypnotoad! Additionally, a reviewer can simply press the add comment button on all review posts and it passes audit reviews even if no comment is posted. –  Ren Feb 28 '13 at 14:17
    
You should always be careful in reviewing :) If you feel tired while reviewing, you are more prone to making mistakes and should take a break. –  Ren Feb 28 '13 at 14:26
    
And they would have got away with it too if it wasn't for you meddling kids! –  Rory Feb 28 '13 at 16:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

While there are always going to be edge cases where an observant reviewer can spot the audits, this is easily amended so I'll change it.

Starting with the next build, first post and late answer audits will have more reasonable (but faked) creation, edit, and activity dates.

You'll still be able to spot inconsistencies if you look hard enough, but if you're looking that closely you're either a good reviewer or consciously malicious (which implies human intervention, not audit tasks, are needed to deal with you).

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