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The scenario is that the OP (of the answer) intially posted an answer to a question, which then received many upvotes and was accepted by the asker. However, later the OP completely changed his answer.

The votes that were cast were for the initial answer and not the now altered answer. The answer that was accepted was also the original answer. However the current answer is radically different.

Now, how should this situation be dealt with ? (Generally)

One example that I came across. Whats the appropriate action in this specific scenario?

enter link description here

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5  
Meh, private beta. I can't see it. –  Mysticial Mar 31 '13 at 4:52
    
@Mysticial That example is similar to what I described. –  AsheeshR Mar 31 '13 at 4:53
    
Could this be classified as rage trolling (not rage quitting)? –  Cole Johnson Mar 31 '13 at 4:57
    
When you say OP, do you mean the actual OP or is the person who posted the answer different than the person who asked the question? –  Juhana Mar 31 '13 at 6:30
    
@Juhana Original poster of the answer. –  AsheeshR Mar 31 '13 at 6:32
2  
Ok. I've never seen the term used for anything other than the person who asked the question. –  Juhana Mar 31 '13 at 6:33
    
@Mysticial i.stack.imgur.com/t2uHH.png –  Manishearth Mar 31 '13 at 6:48
    
@Manishearth Adding this^ and breaking into Private betas meta.stackexchange.com/questions/173383/…, you should get a network ban :P –  AsheeshR Mar 31 '13 at 6:55
    
@AshRj: Hey, I only broke in because of our discussion. It's YOUR fault :P –  Manishearth Mar 31 '13 at 9:40

2 Answers 2

It's more or less OK. The point of comments is to improve answers. However, it may be desirable to ask the OP to delete his answer and repost a new answer if the changes are radical and nullify the initial post.

In the case of meta posts, it doesn't matter much. If it comes to deciding consensus, the timeline tells us which votes came in before the edit and which ones came after.

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3 Votes is a lot for the RE meta and is the consensus. The problem is that the OP (question) saw and agreed with the original answer. So, the OP believes and is probably acting on the initial opinion which in this case could be a problematic situation. –  AsheeshR Mar 31 '13 at 7:00
    
Side point: only mods can delete an accepted answer. –  Mat Mar 31 '13 at 7:35
    
@AshRj: Either way, this is a matter of network policy. The RE meta has little to none say in this. They can answer questions and explain the situation to others, but the votes don't do anything. –  Manishearth Mar 31 '13 at 9:39
    
@Mat: You sure? I think that anyone can self delete an accepted answer... –  Manishearth Mar 31 '13 at 9:41
    
Nope, I'm certain you can't. –  Mat Mar 31 '13 at 9:41
    
@Mat: Well, I have a delete button on some of my accepted answers here. Not sure what happens if I follow through with it, though :s –  Manishearth Mar 31 '13 at 9:42
    
meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5221/… - see "When can't I delete my own post?" –  Mat Mar 31 '13 at 9:43
    
@Mat: fair enough :) –  Manishearth Mar 31 '13 at 9:45
    
However, 3 privileged users still can delete it (if it has a negative score). –  Second Rikudo Mar 31 '13 at 10:46

I disagree with encouragement to post a new answer, and all I'd say is that the integrity of the original should largely remain in tact and the new additions augment, or be augmented by, that content.

The formatting is at the discretion of the poster (some just append additions, some mark with an "EDIT:", others just let the answer flow, and some will put the original at the bottom perhaps marked as obsolete or whatever).

The point is to not really change the substance that began the income of up- or down-votes.

The revisions give a decent history of changes to the post but I don't think that gives licence to alter the meaning per revision. Imagine a class in source control that each time you check in has a different purpose. Crazy.

Therefore, in this specific case and some like it, I'd rollback the post to the last version and incorporate the new.

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