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I was reading a post and noticed 2 spelling and grammar errors. See the preferred answer here:

Singleton instance instantiation

But I was not able to correct due to this notice:

Edits must be at least 6 characters; is there something else to improve in this post?

How can that possibly be a helpful restriction?

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Please don't use the bug tag for discussion type questions. Use it when reporting actual bugs - when things don't work the way there were designed. –  Oded Jun 14 '13 at 9:59
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@Oded: The way things were designed is itself a bug. –  endolith Aug 23 '13 at 21:41
    
@endolith: No, it isn't. A bug is something that works in a way other than which it was designed, not something that works in a way other than you wish it did. Just because someone disagrees with the implementation does not make it a "bug". –  Ken White Aug 23 '13 at 23:57
    
@KenWhite: I'll concede to calling it a "design flaw", then. –  endolith Aug 24 '13 at 0:30
    
@endolith: I'll concede to "design decision to which you object". :-) I happen to agree with it, as it prevents new users who are badge/rep hunting from making irrelevant edits that take no effort just to gain quick rep and ignore other things that could be improved in the post they're editing. "I'll just fix these two transposed letters and get credit for another edit! Who cares about the broken code formatting, missing words, poor punctuation, or any of that other stuff? Someone else can fix those things!" –  Ken White Aug 24 '13 at 0:37
    
@KenWhite: So don't give rep for small edits. Blocking them altogether is an idiotic design decision which leads to crap like this. No, there is not always something else to fix. –  endolith Aug 24 '13 at 3:42
    
@endolith: If the problem is so minor that < 6 characters will fix it, it's minor enough to leave alone for another user who has sufficient rep to edit it. Fighting to implement some complex situation to remove a non-problem is a waste of effort that could be better spent elsewhere. This is similar to the common "premature optimization" when writing code - you're working too hard to fix something that isn't broken in the first place. If you don't want to be subject to the 6-character edit rule, put forth enough effort in other areas to earn sufficient rep not to be subject to it. –  Ken White Aug 24 '13 at 3:49
    
@KenWhite: Character count has no correlation with importance, as indicated by the many complaints about this stupid policy preventing people from fixing important 2-character errors in source code. –  endolith Aug 24 '13 at 4:39
    
@endolith: Sorry. The fact you call the policy "stupid" is irrelevant. If you object to the guidelines, do as the asker of this question did (post here asking for it to be changed). I doubt you'll find enough support to get it implemented. You call it stupid; I call it smart. We already have a 50/50 split on the validity. Name calling isn't necessary; if you don't like the implementation, you have choices - post here asking to have it changed, accept it and move on, go somewhere else, or write your own site that allows random edits by anyone who wants to edit for any reason. :-) –  Ken White Aug 24 '13 at 4:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Because as a user with <2000 reputation, your edits must be approved by 3 users. You're wasting their time if it's for a minor edit.

Try to go a bit more substantial, there usually are better things to improve in the same post. I was able to submit a suggested edit that went past the 6-character filter because I changed more things.

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OK fair enough. –  user619818 Jun 14 '13 at 10:13
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What about typos? So, answers with tons of typos will end up being more correct than answers with just one single typo? –  giorgian Aug 7 '13 at 10:36
    
@giorgian Someone else can fix it. <2k users aren't the only editors. –  Manishearth Aug 7 '13 at 11:11
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@Manishearth sure thing, but spotting a typo and having to leave it there is a pain. –  giorgian Aug 7 '13 at 12:42
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@giorgian You'd be surprised at how few cases there are where the typo is the only thing that you can possibly fix. –  Manishearth Aug 7 '13 at 17:00

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