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I have some problem to understanding Opportunistic Locks. The document in MSDN is too hard to understand for me, so I hope I can get some kind help from SO, but I don't know if it is suitable to post a question like "understanding Opportunistic Locks" in SO.

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Two things would help: 1) What parts do you find hard to understand? 2) What problem are you trying to solve with opportunistic locking? Could you update your question above with that information? –  dcaswell Sep 16 '13 at 2:19
    
@user814064 +1 thanks your kind help. I know what I should do for this situation. –  Joe.wang Sep 16 '13 at 2:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Your question would be more suitable for Programmers than Stack Overflow. Programmers is focused on conceptual questions, a question seeking for an explanation of a concept is right up our alley. You can find more details on what the site is about and what questions we welcome in our help center.

However, you should take care to tell us what exactly your current understanding of oplocks is, and what exactly is confusing you. Programmers, similarly to Stack Overflow, works best with specific and well defined questions. Also, our answerers are more likely to pay attention to your question if you show us that you've worked hard to understand oplocks on your own, and have done sufficient research. Reading just the one MSDN article may not be enough to convince people to invest time in helping you. It might be worth it to do a simple web search for opportunistic locking and reading a handful of articles before you ask your question.

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Thanks your help and showing me a way how to get help from SO for me. –  Joe.wang Sep 16 '13 at 2:37
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@Joe.wang You are welcome. The more important thing is to not be afraid to tell us what your current understanding of oplocks is, even if it's completely wrong. By telling us, you are also showing us that you've put at least some effort into understanding oplocks, and you make it a lot easier for answerers to guide you through the concept. –  Yannis Sep 16 '13 at 2:41

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