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I've notice that many questions are being closed when they don't show the code as:

Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist

The correct reason is above it in the Closing > Off-Topic dialog box:

Questions concerning problems with code you've written must describe the specific problem — and include valid code to reproduce it — in the question itself. See SSCCE.org for guidance.

I just wanted to bring this to closers attention, and hope we can close for the correct reason. The purpose is so that the poster will know what he really has to do (include code) as opposed to him not having understanding.

It would also help if all the close reasons were listed, or something like this.

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Hmmm, downvoters must have real problem with reading documentation :) –  Lance Roberts Oct 24 '13 at 16:10
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I disagree. The one being selected states include attempted solutions. If they don't include any code, then that close reason is correct. I use the SSCCE close reason when they blast a giant block of code with no explanation of the possible issue...I'm not going to debug 500 lines of code. –  bluefeet Oct 24 '13 at 16:11
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Plus, how are we going to shame them by implying they don't have a minimal understanding of their problem if we use the other close reason? –  LittleBobbyTables Oct 24 '13 at 16:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

I usually use the include valid code close reason when I have some reason to believe the OP has some code to show us. If they're describing code that they've tried, or they're posting a link to their code on another site that I can't get to, I think that's the proper close reason. I also use it when they post a wall of code that's just too much for anyone to debug, or if they post a lot of code without any attempt to explain what it's supposed to do and what the problem is.

There are a lot of questions that are asking for code that don't even hint that the OP has anything at all to show us though, and in those cases I select the demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved close reason. "Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results" does tell them what they need to do.

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The "include valid code" is also applicable if they post code but the problem cannot be reproduced using that code. –  Servy Oct 24 '13 at 16:22

I disagree with what you are saying.

The close reason explicitly states include attempted solutions, why they didn't work. If they include no possible attempt at solving the problem, then that is the correct close reason. If this is a give me the code question, then they will get this close reason because they haven't shown a minimal understanding of the problem.

My interpretation of the SSCCE close reason is when they post a block of code and expect some sort of debugging guru to fix it and they don't include any explanation of where the possible issue is.

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I though these were fairly clear...

Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist

Translation: give me teh codez.

Questions concerning problems with code you've written must describe the specific problem — and include valid code to reproduce it — in the question itself. See SSCCE.org for guidance.

Translation: The OP has said "I've got a problem" or "There's an error". The existence of code is irrelevant

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+1 For the first part. Although for the second, the existence of code is important - it is just that it needs to be code that reproduces the problem or error. –  Travis J Oct 24 '13 at 16:17
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I'm saying that it doesn't matter whether the OP has provided code or not; you can still close using this reason if they've said "I've got a problem" but not given you enough information to solve it @TravisJ. –  ben is uǝq backwards Oct 24 '13 at 16:20
    
To be clear, you're saying that the "problems with code you've written" reason is a two-pronged test? 1) Must include valid code AND 2) Must describe the specific problem. Then failure of either part means the question is subject to closure? –  Josh Caswell Oct 24 '13 at 18:44
    
No, one @Josh. Must describe the specific problem; the existence of code is irrelevant. In the vast majority of situations code will be one of those things that are required to solve problems with code... –  ben is uǝq backwards Oct 24 '13 at 20:00

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