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I just joined this community and posted my very first question. But after some few minutes, i realised it's been on hold. Is there anything i said that was inappropriate?

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marked as duplicate by Time Traveling Bobby, gnat, Martijn Pieters, Rory Alsop, hims056 Nov 6 '13 at 11:34

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Because answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references or specific expertise. –  Joachim Sauer Nov 6 '13 at 10:23
    
Ou so it doesn't basically mean that i did something wrong. right? –  Max Mars Nov 6 '13 at 10:25
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What you did wrong is ask this question. Check the help center for details about how we think about opinion-based questions and why they are not appropriate here. And note that my comment is a verbatim copy of what it says in the text box below your question, so you could have gotten that answer simply by reading. –  Joachim Sauer Nov 6 '13 at 10:26
    
seems more like i'm not welcome here. i thought i would have found my answer here as a beginning programmer.thanks –  Max Mars Nov 6 '13 at 10:28
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You don't need to favorite your own questions, you will receive notifications about changes anyway. –  Time Traveling Bobby Nov 6 '13 at 10:30
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@MaxMars: no, you misinterpret what I'm saying. SO is not a forum, it has specific rules and one of those rules is that opinion-based questions are simply not welcome (because they are not a good fit for this format). It's not about you not being welcome, it's about the question. The most relevant part of the help center for this situation is this page on subjective questions. –  Joachim Sauer Nov 6 '13 at 10:30
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Stack explicitly forbids voting on persons, all votes, up, down, close, reopen and so on, are on specific posts. So that's not about you at all. It can become a bit about you only if you will post several questions that does not meet standards, but then you will only be required to fix your questions before you're allowed to ask more. –  Mołot Nov 6 '13 at 10:34
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For further information about what @Mołot said, see How does Downvoting affect the other users. –  Time Traveling Bobby Nov 6 '13 at 10:37
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ok i have read the rules but i still don't think it's fair to beginners who seek to get some advice from the exprerienced ones.i joined because i strongly believed i would find some reliabe help. having said that, i would like to know how i can best reconstruct this question so that it would meet all the requirements. thank you. –  Max Mars Nov 6 '13 at 10:38
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If you don't believe that rules are fair, you shouldn't have joined. Or you should ask on meta for them to be changed instead of simply violating them. They wouldn't be changed, but at least you would get explanation why. wish you all the best at editing your question, honestly :) –  Mołot Nov 6 '13 at 10:39
    
please do you have an answer to the later part of my question? at this moment i'm feeling very unwelcomed here telling me i shouldn't have joined. i'm not against the rules in general and i didn't violate them deliberately. please take it easy on me. –  Max Mars Nov 6 '13 at 10:43
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@MaxMars: I don't believe that the people who responded earlier were intending to say something like you are unwelcome. The major issue was the content - we don't take into consideration when closing questions whether you are new or not (for that matter, I've been flamed on Meta for asking stupid questions with some reputation already). Different people find different ways to make programming interesting, which inevitably means that answers are likely to be based on their opinion of "interesting", which makes it hard to answer in a way that is objective, which is what SO is based on. –  Qantas 94 Heavy Nov 6 '13 at 10:44
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I don't think the original question can really be improved. Programming can only be learnt properly by practicing, so practice. While you do so, you will encounter practical problems that are a good fit for SO. If you encounter such a problem, and there is not yet an answer for it on SO, make an SSCCE. Sometimes you will even find your bug while doing so, and won't need to go to SO. Above all, enjoy the exercise - programming should be fun! –  S.L. Barth Nov 6 '13 at 10:46
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@Max "ok i have read the rules but i still don't think it's fair to beginners who seek to get some advice from the experienced ones." - the problem isn't seeking to get some advice - that is fine; the issue is about what?. Stackoverflow works well because it is focused on actual coding questions; yours... well, it kinda just isn't one. It is a life question. That isn't what the people who enjoy the resources that the site has to offer want to be doing here. –  Marc Gravell Nov 6 '13 at 11:28

1 Answer 1

The only real problem is you misunderstand what Stack Overflow is about.

It is not a general free-for-all forum where any questions related to programming are welcome.

It is a Question & Answers site where you ask specific questions and get specific answers. Beginner questions are absolutely welcome, but the problem is you didn't ask a question.

Your title says it all:

Source of inspiration for beginning programmers (Java & C#)

This is not a specific question. You are seeking out opinions & advice from everyone and those questions are not in the scope of Stack Overflow. To help guide you in how to ask an on-topic question, you should check out What topics can I ask about here? and What types of questions should I avoid asking? from the help center.

It is going to be difficult to turn this into an on-topic question, however, because you really don't have a specific question in there. If you were to go get yourself a good C# book1 and while reading and working through the exercises you find something that is unclear, then you can ask a specific question about that specific problem.

Then later as you start writing your first program, if you encounter issues there, you can show a small except of the code that is causing you problems (and can reproduce the problem) and get help with it.

1 - As Ken correctly points out in the comments a questions asking for a good C# book or any similar reference is off topic as well.

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Obligatory reminder that asking for a recommendation for that "good C# book" is also off-topic here, because it's an opinion based question for a tool/library/reference/off-site resources, before the question gets asked. :) –  Ken White Nov 6 '13 at 11:55

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