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We're encouraged to answer our own posts, yet we cannot answer our own questions. [At the time this question was asked, that second link said "You cannot accept your own answer to a question." –G.] How, then is the Self-Learner badge awarded? The badge's page states:

Answered your own question with at least 3 up votes.

So how does SO know that I answered the question. Or does it simply accept any response from the author? Further, are reputation points awarded to the original author, or the most recent author of the post?

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Sep 5 '09 at 14:08

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4 Answers 4

I think it means that you posted an answer to your own question (not marked your own question as answered). If you post a question and then post a response and someone up-votes it 3 times then you earn the badge.

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Ahh, thanks guys...Of course I didn't find this related post until I had posted it :)

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lol, this answer got me the 'Self-Learner' badge. +1 Funny, anyone? –  tsilb Oct 31 '08 at 18:52
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actually that is pretty funny, lol –  Jeff Atwood Dec 1 '08 at 5:05

You don't have to accept your reply.

You just have to reply to your own question and also receive 3 up votes on that reply.

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You simply post an answer to your own question, then wait for 3 people to up-vote it.

Note - you can 'answer' your own question, you just can't 'accept' your own answer.

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Now we 'can' accept our own answers, I have done it several times. It just doesn't provide the 2 points. Of course you wrote that in 2008, things must have changed since. –  TheIndependentAquarius May 30 '12 at 9:19

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