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This is a minor nit, but help center article titles should be <H1>, not <H3> Having them <H3> means that they blend in with all of the subtitles. It cannot be fixed manually via moderator editing, because the title of the article is not part of the edit text, and it's semantically incorrect anyway.

Example:

How do I ask a good question?

We’d love to help you. To improve your chances of getting an answer, here are some tips:

Search, and research

...and keep track of what you find. Even if you don't find a useful answer elsewhere on the site, including links to related questions that haven't helped can help others in understanding how your question is different from the rest.

Should be:

How do I ask a good question?

We’d love to help you. To improve your chances of getting an answer, here are some tips:

Search, and research

...and keep track of what you find. Even if you don't find a useful answer elsewhere on the site, including links to related questions that haven't helped can help others in understanding how your question is different from the rest.

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What 'bout <h2>? –  Undo Jan 9 at 18:13
    
What about it?... –  Robert Harvey Jan 9 at 18:14
1  
Using it instead of <h1>? h1 seems kinda overkill. –  Undo Jan 9 at 18:14
3  
But it is the semantically correct HTML tag, given that it is the title of the article, and not a subtitle or subheading. Have a look here. –  Robert Harvey Jan 9 at 18:15
    
More nitpick, I think you're talking about stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-ask? From what I'm seeing, the article title is <h2> and the section headings are <h3>. There is a very slight visual font size difference between the two. But as you state, semantically <h1> does seem appropriate. –  Steven V Jan 9 at 19:20
    
@StevenV: Help Center > Asking is <H1> (View Source). Which seems a bit weird to me. Programmers used to have this same problem; <H2> and <H3> were virtually indistinguishable from each other, until they changed the font sizes in the CSS slightly. –  Robert Harvey Jan 9 at 19:23
    
I didn't even notice the breadcrumbs were <h1>. I'll agree that is weird... –  Steven V Jan 9 at 19:25

1 Answer 1

The <h1> tag should be used as a heading for a document, an article or a page. In this case, the article title How do I ask a good question? is nothing else than a page title/header and as such should have the <h1> tag.

Use <h1> for top-level heading

<h1> is the HTML element for the first-level heading of a document:

  • If the document is basically stand-alone, for example Things to See and Do in Geneva, the top-level heading is probably the same as the title.
  • If it is part of a collection, for example a section on Dogs in a collection of pages about pets, then the top level heading should assume a certain amount of context; just write <h1>Dogs</h1> while the title should work in any context: Dogs - Your Guide to Pets.

Unlike the title, this element can include links, emphasis and other HTML phrase elements.

The default font size for <h1> in some browsers have, unfortunately, motivated many writers and tools to use an <h2> element in stead. This is misleading to tools that take advantage of heading structure of pages, such as Amaya's table of contents view. Consider using Cascading Style Sheets, which are designed to express the author's preferred font sizes corresponding to elements such as <h1> and <h2>.

Reference: World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), Quality Assurance, Tips for Webmasters Use <h1> for top-level heading

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