What is meta? ×
Meta Stack Exchange is where users like you discuss bugs, features, and support issues that affect the software powering all 134 Stack Exchange communities.

I wonder how is this question opinion based or religious exactly. I feel like there has been some overreaction from the moderator Robert Harvey.

The close reason states:

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.

The answer (which has been already accepted here) can be summed with two concepts:

  • const-correctness
  • compiler-optimization

I can "accept" that it can be too broad, I definitely think it should be closed as duplicate, but opinionate... how?


Apparently the question was closed when the text mentioned a religious war between colleagues. Here's the original text:

I'm having a bit of a religious war with a coworker regarding the value of declaring stack variables that are not meant to change as const.

What are people's opinions pro/con this approach. I know what my reasons are.

Again, except for the mentioned war the OP is fighting against his colleagues, no trace of opinion based question. In fact the question (which, yes, is lacking the ? at the end) is exactly the same as the one proposed now:

What are the advantages in declaring a stack variable constant?

Yes, it mentions the word "opinion" but it is pretty obvious the OP is not asking for opinions since the question's purpose, for him, is to solve the opinions war he is fighting.

share|improve this question
    
By the OP: In RobertHarvey 's defense, the original question did mention a religious war so I edited it. –  Paulo Scardine Feb 19 at 1:43
    
@LowerClassOverflowian, so the fact that a religious war has been mentioned by the OP, the question is automatically religious? –  Jefffrey Feb 19 at 1:44
1  
Without the war, it's still "what are the advantages". To what end? In what scenario? Compared against what? –  random Feb 19 at 2:01
    
Compared against... not using const? To the end of having a better program? In any scenario? But then again, I can "accept" that it can be too broad. –  Jefffrey Feb 19 at 2:03
    
@Jefffrey What defines 'better'? It's turtles all the way down. –  George Stocker Feb 19 at 2:12
    
@GeorgeStocker, Not really. A "better" program is: more efficient and/or clearer to read. There's nothing broad in the definition. But even if the definition was broad, the concept of pro and cons are not, in this context. –  Jefffrey Feb 19 at 2:17
1  
@Jefffrey We can, of course, disagree. Pros and Cons (by their very nature) stray out of bounds very quickly on Stack Overflow. While this may not be what you want, it is the sentiment of the community and the design of the site. –  George Stocker Feb 19 at 2:19
    
@GeorgeStocker, oh, yes please, tell me more about it. –  Jefffrey Feb 19 at 2:59
1  
@Jefffrey Notice how almost all of those questions are really old. The sites standards have changed in this regard. They were once allowed; now they're not. –  Servy Feb 19 at 3:45
    
@Jefffrey this comment from animuson suns it up nicely: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/221949/… –  George Stocker Feb 19 at 12:21
    
@Jefffrey They are now closed. Thanks for bringing those up. –  George Stocker Feb 19 at 12:47

1 Answer 1

The original question said:

I'm having a bit of a religious war with a coworker regarding the value of declaring stack variables that are not meant to change as const.

[...]

What are people's opinions pro/con this approach. I know what my reasons are.

OP doesn't make it clear what his reasons are. All we know is that he mentioned religious war and people's opinions. This was correctly closed as primarily opinion-based

The revised question says:

What are the advantages in declaring a stack variable constant?

This was correctly reopened, because this question is asking for objective differences, facts if you will.

share|improve this answer
    
The first question has a little bit of background to it, but the two are exactly the same. –  Jefffrey Feb 19 at 1:51
1  
@Jefffrey I respectfully disagree. There's a huge difference between what are people's opinions and what are the advantages. –  Stijn Feb 19 at 1:52
    
The original question is effectively asking pro and cons of applying const-correctness. The reason the OP included the word "opinion" is because of the background to it. –  Jefffrey Feb 19 at 1:54
2  
I believe the reason we have human moderators instead of keyword parsers is that the human can look past keywords and understand what is being asked –  Glenn Teitelbaum Feb 19 at 1:55
    
I think we should read just a little between the lines to see what the OP meant with "What are people's opinions pro/con this approach". And he was obviously not asking for opinions since the question's purpose (in the story) is to solve the opinions war he is fighting. –  Jefffrey Feb 19 at 1:56

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .