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On SO, I wanted to vote on a question where both the up- and down-vote symbols were showing in gray. I got the "Vote too old" message. I probably did vote earlier.

I checked a few other (older) questions and sometimes my votes were marked in color, sometimes not. I can't see a pattern.

So the question is: where did the visual cue go? I hope this isn't by design.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First time you vote on a post, the ticker starts ticking for the "no more vote change" window.

If within a few seconds you take that vote back or vote the other way, it still counts from the first vote movement.

After a couple minutes have passed, the vote is now too old to change.

Even if both arrows are in grey, if you have at one point in the life of that question voted, it will mean you can no longer vote again until that post has been edited.

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I experimented a little, but I cannot find a correlation between coloring and possible-to-change. –  Henk Holterman Sep 19 '09 at 10:37
    
The coloured arrows are only for votes that stick, if you unvote, then it wouldn't show in colour. –  random Sep 19 '09 at 10:46
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OK, that would mean I had voted and retracted those votes. Possible, I can't remember exactly. –  Henk Holterman Sep 19 '09 at 11:51

The second you take a vote action on a post, the clock starts ticking.

That includes undoing votes.

So in this case you voted and then undid your vote; you can't vote again on that post until it is edited.

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Oh well, here, an upvote for your steed. And remember, ride with the sun on your back if you want to see the path of the pony trail. –  random Sep 20 '09 at 3:45

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