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I want to search for questions in SO that include both the keywords "eclipse" and "rse".

But the search only shows me all questions that have either one of the keywords.

How can I refine my search so that I can see results that have both keywords?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Knuckle it down some if you think one of the terms would be used as a tag. That way you just need to search with the other term inside the tagged questions and that should bring the relevancy up some.

To search with a word forced as a tag, surround it with square brackets.

In this example, you're using "eclipse" as the tag and "rse" as the TNT you want to blow up with.

search: [eclipse] rse

If you want to really hunker down, force them both as tags:

search: [eclipse] [rse]

This does tighten to a great deal though, questions must be tagged with both tags if they were to show in the search results.

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The posts with both keywords will get the higher rank. So the very first items you get contains the things what you need.

If you are not getting such result, that means there are no posts with both keywords.

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Sorry to warm this one up again, but only to read this clearly: There is no way for me to see (right on the search page) that my multy-keyword-seach produced no exact hits ? –  Nils Oct 11 '09 at 11:26

Use the SO search what the SO search is good for; use Google for what Google is good for.
Or do what random said.

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What actually is the StackOverflow search good for John? It's a load of crap in my experience. –  user135186 Sep 24 '09 at 12:06
    
@ashh: Follow my link and have a look at the Advanced Super Ninja options. Isn't that easy to do that with Google. –  Ladybug Killer Sep 24 '09 at 12:27

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