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Is there an editing ‘grace period’ on answers after they have been posted?

I made a change to one of my pre-existing answers and then about two minutes later I was looking over the previous changes I had made. I rolled back to a previous answer expecting my already made edit and comment to stick around. They didn't, so the question I have is whether this is intended behaviour or a bug.

On a side note why have the tag possible-bug when bug is required? Or is that a user-submitted tag?

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marked as duplicate by random, Jeff Atwood Oct 29 '09 at 4:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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It's a user-submitted tag. You can tell, 'cause it's not required and there's no fat gray border. If folks stopped using it, it would go away... –  Shog9 Oct 29 '09 at 1:53
    
So you're expecting a rollback to not rollback any edits? –  random Oct 29 '09 at 1:59
    
@random: he's expecting the changes he made before he did the rollback to show up in the edit history. but they are not, because he's doing the rollback within 5 minutes of the edit –  Kip Oct 29 '09 at 3:18
    
I wish that the tag [possible-bug] would go away. –  Brad Gilbert Oct 29 '09 at 3:25

1 Answer 1

Any edits made solely by the same person within a five-minute period are only counted as one edit, and only one edit from that period is stored in the revision history. I'm guessing this is because they want to keep the number of revisions down? It also makes it so you can fix small typos without upping the number of revisions (which is good, because too many revisions == automatic community wiki).

So if you edit a question, then within five minutes do a rollback, your edit will be lost. I'm not sure if this is what is supposed to happen in the case of a rollback as opposed to just an edit--that'd be for the team to decide. My guess is that this is intentional, so you can undo "oops!" moments.

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Yes this has always been a feature, I tracked down the point at which it was discussed for another question: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/9090/… –  Brad Gilbert Oct 29 '09 at 3:42

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