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A long time ago (but still in the same galaxy) I answered a question about LINQ and the Entity Framework. I wrote an answer -- and if you check the times the answer had sat for nearly 20 minutes before I answered and it was the only answer for several days -- that referenced how I solved a similar problem with LINQ to SQL. I prefaced my answer with the fact that I hadn't used EF so my answer may not apply.

Today I got a snide comment and a downvote, presumably from the same person, basically indicating that I shouldn't have answered since I didn't know what I was talking about. I was tempted to delete the answer but the answer was seemingly helpful to the OP and could be helpful to others who end up at the question looking for a LINQ to SQL solution. The OP later answered his own question with a solution that uses the same pattern as mine, but is specific to EF.

I'm wondering, though, should I leave the answer -- including said downvote and snide remark -- or delete it now that the question has a proper, accepted answer.

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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Another option is to edit it to say what you just said here.

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Good idea. I may do that after this question has run its course. –  tvanfosson Nov 2 '09 at 17:42
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should I leave the answer -- including said downvote and snide remark -- or delete it now that the question has a proper, accepted answer.

Ignore the downvote and snide comment (which, in the realm of snide comments on SO was rather tame/lame) and judge the answer on it other merits.

  • the answer was seemingly helpful to the OP
  • the answer could be helpful to others who end up at the question looking for a LINQ to SQL solution.

vs

the question has a proper, accepted answer.

Quite frankly, it doesn't matter how many 'perfect' answers a question has. If it has an answer that is slightly off to one side, but still useful or applicable in nearly any way, then it should not be removed.

Going further, I don't understand the reasoning behind downvoting answers that are imperfect. If they are blatantly wrong, perhaps. Otherwise, just upvote the other answers ahead of the one that is less helpful.

For that reason, you can ignore the downvote and snide comments, especially since you've given explanation. Let the haters hate, and go on helping people out as much as you can.

-Adam

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I think it's ok since you posted a theoretical solution, albeit not a 1-1 with the technology in question. I've posted many things (on SF) that I admit were not direct answers, but ways of helping the OP along the path of discovering the correct answer. Some of these are even accepted by the OP. Not everyone's going to agree with that methodology (thus your downvote...), but if it helps I don't see a problem in keeping it around. Not that you'd be worried about the rep, but you can CW it :P

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Tough call.

I can understand that you feel like you're taking a black eye on your "reputation." The answer doesn't have the appearance of being helpful based on the lingering down-vote and the comments. But I cannot comment technically.

If you feel that the answer might help someone in the future, you can say "screw the voting" and leave it. Edit your post to include the information you discussed here. But, from the lack of "appreciative tone" in the comments and voting, I can understand that you might feel like taking your ball and going home (delete). Truthfully, that's probably what I would do.

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Not applicable to the example you gave, but when I know I made a mistake, I often want to make sure the question asker (and maybe others who might post the same wrong answer) knows about that as well. Just deleting might not have that effect.

Hence, I often tend to leave wrong answers, using strikethrough to indicate what was wrong.

And even if I do decide to delete it, I might still use the strikethrough and add a note like "I will delete this tomorrow" or something.

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