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From the careers.stackoverflow.com FAQ (How Does It Work? section):

[...] Once they’re interested, you will get an email indicating their interest. [...]

A couple of questions:

  • How exactly does this process of "indicating interest" work?
  • Do I get an email from careers.stackoverflow.com or directly from the employer?
  • What information about the employer will be provided at the time the "interest is indicated"?
  • What are the candidates options to reply to an employer showing interest?

Follow-up questions from the comments:

  • "Directly connected with the employer via email" means they get my provided email address and I get theirs?
  • So the initial contact is from careers.stackoverflow.com? What email address is used?
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1 Answer 1

Employers search; employers have access to your full private CV, whatever you opted to put on there. Employers click through on CVs. If they see CVs they like, they indicate interest.

By "indicate interest" I mean employers click on a button on our private web UI to initiate the contact.

This causes an email to be sent from careers to you, which asks you to click through -- we like to know if you are interested, or not.

If you are not interested, then you decline. If you are interested, indicate that with a click and you are directly connected with the employer via email. SO Careers is no longer involved at that point; it's between you and them.

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So, "directly connected with the employer via email" means they get my provided email address and I get theirs? –  cschol Nov 9 '09 at 13:14
1  
So the initial contact is from careers.stackoverflow.com? What email address is used? I don't want any potential opportunities to get filed as spam...so long as the initial email from a fixed address gets through then the spam box can be monitored more closely. –  John Clayton Nov 9 '09 at 20:22

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