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When careers was originally released, when there were no employers around and it wasn't even complete, there was a "promotional" deal for early adopters. Stack Overflow friends jumped in out of their trust and love to SO. Careers pricing has changed significantly since then. However, instead of going up, it has practically went down. This, of course, contradicts what has been promised:

Fair warning, the price absolutely will go up in 2010. So if you think you might need to file your CV — that is, make it searchable by hiring managers — any time in the next year, consider jumping on this offer before January 1.

This looks quite unfair to SO's true friends, the early adopters. Considering the fact that there's a loophole (taking advantage of the 90-day money back guarantee and refiling with the new pricing), I think it makes sense to promote the original accounts to the new lifetime offer.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think we should have the option to pay the difference to upgrade to lifetime

You can of course do this -- if you'd like to upgrade to lifetime and apply your $29 toward that, just email us -- careers@stackoverflow.com

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I agree. I joined early and paid $25 to file my CV under the premise that I may want to use it at some point in the next 3 years.

I assume that when I actually do file, it will only be for a brief period while I search for a job. If I had waited, that would now only cost me $19.

I'm not really annoyed, I like that I'm supporting SO anyway, and $25 isn't exactly a lot, and I'm not going to start demanding a refund or anything, but as I've paid over the odds, lifetime membership would be nice ;)

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Of course not. Those of us who jumped onto the bandwagon were taking a risk. We knew the risk was there and we took it. That's the price of being at the head of the pack.

Or are you one of those people who waited in line for a day to buy a $600 iPhone and then whined when they lowered the price? You either wait for the Blu-Ray to win, or you jump in and buy an HD-DVD player and suck it up when it loses the battle.

Learn to live with the risky choices you've made, or don't make them in the first place.

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+3 (I agree with all paragraphs) –  jmfsg Jan 15 '10 at 13:05
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In general, this is true. However, SO Careers was not really a "product" at the time the promotion was in place - and the point is, nobody has taken the risk. There's still the 90-day money back guarantee and that's exactly why I'm bringing up this offer. This question is not whining. It's making happier, loyal customers for SO (loving SO is why most of us did it in the first place). Instead of making the customers possible take advantage of the loophole, they can generously give them the offer. By the way, those guys who bought the iPhone were compensated with a $200 gift credit. –  LeakyCode Jan 15 '10 at 13:22
    
+1 as both an early CSO user...and an HD-DVD owner. –  Stu Thompson Jan 15 '10 at 13:33
    
@Fearless Spammer: Those iPhone whiners didn't deserve that money back. –  XMLbog Jan 15 '10 at 13:54
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@Welbog: I guess you are misunderstanding this thread as "whining". Personally, I joined careers with 100% certainty that there will never (not in the next 10 years, at least!) be an employer around me. I'm not asking for refund, whining, or anything. I just felt this is the "right" thing for SO to do. It's pretty much like Google's "don't be evil", nothing more. –  LeakyCode Jan 15 '10 at 13:59

I disagree.

However, for those of us who took advantage of this deal up front, I think we should have the option to pay the difference to upgrade to lifetime, or refund the difference to reduce the period to only 1 year (after the initial sign-up).

I think this

Fair warning, the price absolutely will go up in 2010. So if you think you might need to file your CV — that is, make it searchable by hiring managers — any time in the next year, consider jumping on this offer before January 1.

was posted with the best of intentions, but it's hard to argue that it didn't skew their up-front business results.

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Paying the difference is a good option. I can get behind that. –  XMLbog Jan 15 '10 at 14:57

I thought about this quite a bit when it was announced, but ultimately decided that I still got a good deal, and they gave me exactly what they promised I'd get for $29.

So no, of course not.

Your remedies include demanding a refund, and sulking.

But sulking because you got what you paid for is in rather poor form.

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