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I'd like to be able to create my own sets of color coded tags.

Why?

To easily know what group a question belongs to without even reading it.

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if you are not using the ignored tags, you could potentially achieve this with that –  jmfsg Mar 16 '10 at 19:29
    
That gave me an idea: why not let user create custom sets? –  sneg Mar 16 '10 at 19:36
    
you could use greasemonkey on the meantime ;) –  perbert Mar 16 '10 at 19:55
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Why did they name it that? I can't help but picture a mechanic monkey all covered in grease, with a wrench in its hand, walking slowly towards me. It really freaks me out! –  jmfsg Mar 16 '10 at 20:00
    
@voyager: in the meantime I'm creatively using Ignored set, as suggested by Downvoter. –  sneg Mar 16 '10 at 20:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Answer to New Question

I think this is an interesting idea, applying grades of interest to particular tag-sets. Blue means "I really like it," where as green means "Somewhat interested." Or, relating this to your original question, Blue means "I'm proficient in this area," and Green means "I'm still catching on to this area." Anytime you see a blue tag, you know it's easy-rep-earnin' time! Greed tags, it's time to sit down and study a bit to provide a solid answer.

Vestigial-Answer From Original Question

I think the problem is only an illusion. Most of the learning that I do on Stack Overflow is the result of answering questions. Even when I attempt to teach somebody (answering questions) something else, I typically end up learning something as a result of merely reading the answers provided by others.

I think it would be really difficult to accurately divide the learning/teaching experiences on Stack Overflow. Actually, I think it would be completely impossible. You could read the same question twice, provide an answer the first time through, and learn something profound the next time through. Each question contains the potential to both teach, and invite teaching.

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+1: All of our problems are illusions –  jmfsg Mar 16 '10 at 19:34
    
Did @Downvoter just up vote me? WTF...My mind just got blown. –  Jonathan Sampson Mar 16 '10 at 19:36
    
OK, maybe teaching/learning is not a good example for everyone. I'll rephrase my question. –  sneg Mar 16 '10 at 19:38
    
@sneg If you rephrase, neither of our answers will make any sense... –  Jonathan Sampson Mar 16 '10 at 19:41
    
@Jonathan: Sometimes it happens. –  sneg Mar 16 '10 at 19:45
    
@sneg True. I'll embrace the change :) –  Jonathan Sampson Mar 16 '10 at 19:50
    
@Johnatan Sampson: I don't like the actual color of the tagged-interesting css-class. It's so glimmering. Would be nice to configure the interesting tagged entries with your own color. –  cuh Oct 4 '10 at 18:03

This works when you restrict yourself to one of each, but not so well when your interests are broader. Also, I think we're always learning, even in the stuff we're good at. One of the best ways to learn, in fact, is to teach so I don't think I'd use this feature even if it did exist. It would simply make an artificial distinction that I'd rather choose to ignore.

In fact, I'm rethinking the entire interesting/ignored tags thing. With the exception of the single ignored tag I have spam -- I find that I'm interested in enough things that it doesn't really work as a discriminator any more.

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