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I was browsing my reputation audit and noticed this (which looks like a nice new feature not yet mentioned anywhere) in the footer:

rep cap was reached on 16 days
rep cap was exceeded on 22 days

Now this puzzles me. I couldn't find any definition of "reached" vs "exceeded" on meta, but at least common sense would tell me that I can not exceed the rep cap without having reached it first, so the first number should be equal to or greater than the second.

Could someone shed some light on how the above statistics are actually calculated? And, following on that, which of / how do these numbers relate to the Epic and Legendary badges?

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6  
If a rep cap was exceeded in the woods & no one was around to see it, has it really been reached? –  Alconja May 10 '10 at 9:38
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Let me try to answer this clearly.

rep cap was reached via rep from upvotes *only* on 36 days  
rep cap was exceeded on 39 days

In other words, the first line will increment on a day that you receive 200 points from upvotes alone.

The second line will increment if you receive 201 (or more) reputation through any combination of upvotes and accepted answer points.

(I'm pretty sure bounties are excluded here. Not sure about points for accepting answers or getting an edit approved.)

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I believe your last line is wrong based on the discussion at this question. The available evidence points to me losing out on an "exceeded" day because I earned >200 rep but then offered a 500-pt bounty. –  Pops Mar 3 '11 at 21:17
    
@Pop, see my comment on your question. –  jjnguy Mar 3 '11 at 22:21
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See here and here for more info about that. There is no explanation about those two, but my guess is that reached is only from upvotes which reached 200, and exceeded is any day it reached 200+ including accepted answers (but not including bounties).

And I think exceeded is old or current calculation of rep-cap, and reached is probably under thinking or not yet deployed (not so sure) to badge calculations.

Maybe something like this

rep cap was reached on 16 days according to new calculations
rep cap was reached on 22 days according to original calculations

Edit: Please take a look Jeff's comment for the meanings of reached and exceeded

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7  
not exactly.. there is no "old" and "new" here. The two #s are as you said -- did you reach 200 rep from PURE UPVOTES? That's "reached". Did you reach 200 or more rep from upvotes + accepts? That's "exceeded". Neither calculation includes bounties. –  Jeff Atwood May 10 '10 at 9:55
    
remember that before the Great Rep Recalc accepts and bounties were only partially immune to the rep cap. That is, they counted toward the +200 rep cap if it had not been reached yet, so if you got 6 accepted answers at 00:01 UTC that is 6 * 15 = 90 rep you COULD NOT get from upvotes for the rest of the day. –  Jeff Atwood May 10 '10 at 9:58
    
@Jeff, current Epic/Legendary badge calculation is based on which one? reached or exceeded? I think reached, Am I correct? –  YOU May 10 '10 at 10:12
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no, it is based on exceeded, though the description is mildly incorrect and would lead you to believe it is based on reached. –  Jeff Atwood May 10 '10 at 10:18
    
@Jeff, thanks for the explanation. Would it be possible to rephrase the audit output to make its meaning clearer? –  Péter Török May 10 '10 at 10:20
    
Ah, ok @Jeff, that made many things clear. Thanks a lot. –  YOU May 10 '10 at 10:21
4  
@Péter Yes I will add several ö's and a few é's and that should clear up the confusion immediately .. :) –  Jeff Atwood May 10 '10 at 11:12
    
@Jeff, thanks, that will be almost perfect - and could be improved to perfection with just a bit more accents, like in "árvíztűrő tükörfúrógép" :-P –  Péter Török May 10 '10 at 11:33
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