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The recent discussions about deleted questions have reminded me of a bit of a tag-nag I had a month ago. So let's discuss something about deleted stuff that doesn't have to do with whether we're doing it too much/too little. We have too many tags that apply to general deleted material, and I'm starting to think that even 1 is too many at this point. In addition to item-specific tags such as [deleted-questions], [deleted-answers], and [deleted-comments], we have the following that kinda float.

Yes, yes, tag synonyms will save us all. Unfortunately, they're not quite implemented yet, and the current trends make me concerned how it'll show up. Looking at the 3 posts linked in Jeff's recent deletion audit, we have one tagged [delete] [question], one tagged [questions] [delete], and one tagged [deleted-questions].

While in many cases, it benefits us to keep generic tags to help categorize things of similar nature together, I think this particular case doesn't really help us that much. It should be noted that all deleted content falls into the categories of [deleted-questions], [deleted-answers], [deleted-comments], and [deleted-accounts]. I don't think we have anything else to delete, and the difference in the effects of deletion on comments, accounts, and posts is wide enough for me to think that they don't really need to be grouped together. As a comparison, we don't tag "vote-to-close" and "vote-to-delete" questions with "votes" if the only votes in concern are those two, because they are much different compared to standard votes. In my eyes, we benefit greater by cutting out all of the generic "delete" tags and instead categorizing the deleted content by whether it is a post, comment, or account.

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Ok, I merged these tags

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