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When I bold text inline like
*strong*text
it gets parsed as italics instead of either bold or nothing.

I created the above with the following line:

**strong**text  

As I understand it, inline Markdown is disabled here, so this text should really be ignored.

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1  
Encountered this today, was a fair bit frustrating! While there is a workaround in the answers below, it's rather annoying. –  corsiKa Oct 17 '11 at 0:00
2  
This is a feature request now: Add the ability to add emphasis to part of a word in Markdown. –  Arjan Dec 23 '11 at 15:50
2  
This is especially annoying in Japanese (and other languages that don't use spaces). –  Tobias May 5 '13 at 18:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is point 2. in my answer here and will work correctly after the next build.

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For questions and answers (but not comments) there is a workaround with <b> and <i> tags:

<b>strong</b>t<i>ext</i>

Produces:

strongtext

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This workaround is not equivalent. The equivalent workaround would be <strong>strong</strong>t<em>ext</em>. They do not work in comments — which is a shame. –  Nicolas Barbulesco Jan 3 '14 at 9:47

This would be useful when explaining acronyms, such as Hypertext Transfer Protocol.

(Adding as answer since the workaround doesn't work in comments)

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HTTP is not an acronym ;-) but your point is good. –  Nicolas Barbulesco Jan 3 '14 at 9:48
    
@NicolasBarbulesco: Of course HTTP is an acronym, don't be daft! –  Noldorin Nov 22 '14 at 15:59
    
@Noldorin Actually HTTP is an initialism. Acronyms have to be pronouncable. todayifoundout.com/index.php/2012/05/… –  David Given Jul 11 at 7:40
    
@DavidGiven: Yeah, I'm aware of that now, but it's certainly not universally accepted that acronyms don't refer to initialisms. Traditionally, the term acronym was used by most to refer to both strict acronyms (as many would call them now) and initialisms... it's a point of contention among modern linguists, I've learnt. –  Noldorin Jul 12 at 2:19

The only problem I've seen with text being bold & italics is in comments. There doesn't seem to be a problem otherwise.

With the word 'text' above, I used 3 asterisks (*) surrounding the word.

Here, I have used the font menu options above the editor.

Am I missing something?

EDIT:
I see what you're saying. *strong*text will not bold 'strong'. Three asterisks on either side will bold, but then you are left with hanging (*) on either side. The parser does appear to have an inner Twilight Zone when it comes to this markdown.

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1  
I used the "B" button to generate the bold markup. In either case something is wrong - either the button or the parser. –  Good Person May 27 '10 at 11:58
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The problem isn't text being bold and italics, it's text trying to be bold inline, but ending up italic. Basically, emphasizing a single part of a word. In the question, for example, the goal would be "strongtext", with "strong" being bold. Instead we get "strongtext" with strong being italic. –  Grace Note May 27 '10 at 12:16
    
oh...ok, I see what you're saying. –  IAbstract May 27 '10 at 15:50
    
If you put a space after what your trying to bold then you will be fine –  Gage Jul 26 '10 at 17:25
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This would be useful when explaining acronyms, such as <b>H</b>yper<b>t</b>ext <b>T</b>ransfer <b>P</b>rotocol. –  Mechanical snail Aug 18 '11 at 20:01
    
@Mech — Your point is good, although HTTP is not an acronym ;-) –  Nicolas Barbulesco Jan 3 '14 at 9:54

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