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I am sure there are several reasons to make questions community-wiki and most of the questions are made community-wiki for the right reasons.

However, I also get a feeling that there is a sub-conscious/unsaid rule that you deserve only so many points for a particular question. No matter how good/relevant. If have too many upvotes, you're a point glutton - stay in your limits. So if your question seems like it will get several upvotes, you are forced to make it a community wiki. Is this right or am I missing something?


Edit :

This is the specific question.

Within 10 minutes of asking this question. There was a comment to make it community-wiki. that read "This should be a community-wiki" - There were 8 up-votes for that particular comment in a very short time. I was surprised at the speed and the number of up-votes for it. I don't know if others have had a similar experience, but, just left a bitter after taste adding to the fact that more importantly, I had only one responses to the question(possibly because it was made community-wiki).

(Agreed, I should have included this in my initial question & Never-mind the downvotes.)

This experience seemed bizarre so I thought this is a place where I could understand it better.

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4  
-1, tremendous chip on your shoulder without providing concrete examples to discuss. –  user149432 Aug 26 '10 at 4:49
    
Updated the question. I don't mind the downvotes as long as people know where I'm coming from. –  DMin Aug 28 '10 at 12:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Just from looking at the title of your question, I can tell you why it should have been CW. Any time you talk about "Best X" (even best practices), "what do you use for X", etc. you are asking for an opinion-based response. Additionally, because you are asking simply for what other people use, there is no one correct answer. For example if I were to ask

Here is my code. What is causing the ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException in my code?

There is only one answer and it is an answer many people with general knowledge of the language, will agree upon.

However, if I ask

What tools do you use to debug an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException with this code?

That is a much more subjective and opinion-based question. Effectively, there is no right answer, there are many. What is correct simply depends on the person's circumstances.

The SO community has decided that reputation points should not be given to answers or questions that are based on subjectivity. This makes intuitive sense if you think about it: reputation is an indicator to the community that you know what you're talking about and if your reputation is based entirely on your opinion, your expertise isn't going to be as valuable as a person's who's reputation is based entirely on fact that other people can verify for themselves.

Does that make sense?

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Is this right or am I missing something?

You're missing all the massively up-voted, non-CW questions for starters...

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2  
Haha - Great question: stackoverflow.com/questions/2193953/flash-cs4-refuses-to-let-go –  Peter Ajtai Aug 26 '10 at 5:42

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