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I often feel a question needs to be closed because it's too broad to be answered, and it would need many more details to winnow it down to being possible to answer.

Like here, I voted to close this, but chose "Not a real question" which isn't really the best reason, none of the choices fit.

How about we implement a "Too Broad" close reason?

This would help educate those whose questions are closed, so that they could write better questions in the future.

Example:

alt text

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What about modifying the description of "Not a real question" to include questions that are too broad? –  Jon Seigel Sep 13 '10 at 16:48
    
@Jon, that would probably be a solution, but as per my last sentence (just edited in) I don't know if it would be as forceful in getting their attention as the Too Broad reason. –  Lance Roberts Sep 13 '10 at 16:50
    
There were three not-entirely-related questions being asked. So that's the first problem. That each question was itself too broad is another, but "too broad" can actually be an answer... –  Shog9 Sep 13 '10 at 16:52
    
@Shog9, yes, it's a question with multiple problems. –  Lance Roberts Sep 13 '10 at 17:04
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Argh, you got me with that screenshot. I stared at it for quite a while, trying to figure out how on Earth they had managed to close this question as too broad. –  ЯegDwight Sep 14 '10 at 0:37
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Whatever happens, just a suggestion that "Too General" is probably friendlier to those who don't have as good a grasp of English. –  Jim Leonardo Sep 14 '10 at 1:53
    
+1 for a good idea in the abstract, though I prefer the "add this to the NARQ description" solution in practice. –  Pops Sep 14 '10 at 16:45
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3 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I favor editing the NARQ description rather than creating yet another close reason to process.

How about

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form.

to

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form.

done. this will be rolled out tomorrow across all sites.

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Sure, that'd be fine. It would at least assuage my guilt over picking a bad reason. You can see all my other comments that cover all my thoughts on the topic. –  Lance Roberts Sep 14 '10 at 18:07
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Stole my answer. :( –  GManNickG Sep 14 '10 at 21:47
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While the close reason "not a real question" isn't directly what you want, that category covers a wide range of things:

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form.

I think 'vague' + 'ambiguous' is close to 'broad', but not quite right.

We should either add 'too broad' ('too general', 'not specific', etc.) to that list, or we just say 'vague' + 'ambiguous' is close enough.

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+1; I agree with Lance on principle, but it's not worth actually adding another option to the close dialog. –  Pops Sep 14 '10 at 0:24
    
@Pop, I agree that the close box is too busy now, but I figure they'll have to come up with a menu for migration closes, once the Stack Exchange sites start coming out of Beta. –  Lance Roberts Sep 14 '10 at 0:43
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I don't think it'd be necessary to introduce a new reason: ...cannot be reasonably answered in its current form... seems like it's a perfect fit for overly broad questions. While an overly broad question could theoretically be answered definitively, it's probably not reasonable to expect such an answer.

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It's true that it can't be reasonably answered in its current form when it's too broad, but by showing the OP Too Broad in the big bold letters of the close reason, it may more effectively communicate that to him, so that he can learn to ask his questions better. –  Lance Roberts Sep 13 '10 at 16:58
    
@Lance, I think we can use comments for this. –  Pops Sep 14 '10 at 0:25
    
@Pop, yes, that'll work also, just a little more time-consuming. –  Lance Roberts Sep 14 '10 at 0:44
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