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If I enter the following mark-down source:

“*blah*”

into a question or answer, then it works, but in a comment it doesn’t. The asterisks remain literal and don’t turn into italics.

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This is just a simple test. "Another Test". " Second Test ". –  Time Traveling Bobby Sep 16 '10 at 8:59
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I really disagree that this can be “by design”. It’s a real bug. The feature is by design; characters missing from the whitelist aren’t. @Bobby: you are using straight quotation marks, Timwi was using the typographically correct ones. –  Sam Hocevar Dec 11 '11 at 12:55

2 Answers 2

There are too many edge case (in particular around URLs) to allow the full set from proper Markdown here; the two will never be identical in all regards.

However I'm willing to add characters to the "can begin or end formatting" whitelists that shouldn't cause any problems and that are valid use cases for appearing next to formatting.

For the next build, I have added the majority of typographics quotation marks to the list: single and double guillemets, single and double quotations marks (bottom, top 9-shaped, and top 6-shaped). The ellipsis is now allowed at the end of a formatted piece of text as well.

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comment mini-markdown is much, much stricter, and the characters adjacent to the italics or bold must be on the whitelist.

Unicode character U+201d is not on that whitelist.

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Just out of curiosity, can you elaborate this a little more, please? –  Time Traveling Bobby Sep 16 '10 at 9:19
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Where is this whitelist ? –  Jay Elston Jun 16 '11 at 22:21
    
can we somewhere find a specification for mini-Markdown? –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 28 '11 at 14:56
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Could you please add “”‘’ to the whitelist? –  Caramdir Aug 2 '11 at 21:47
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I would, too, like to see “…” ‘…’ in the whitelist, and also «…» (typical French quotation marks) and „…“ (typical German quotation marks). Add 「…」 (Japanese and traditional Chinese) and you will probably support 99% of the languages written on the Internet and no one will complain for a while. –  Sam Hocevar Dec 11 '11 at 12:53

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