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I just created the tag integral-promotion (see this question because, AFAIK, that is the formal name for the concept. However, I see that an integer-promotion tag already exists and is used to refer to the same concept.

I am not trying to collect more badges or anything, but I think it would be appropriate to retag those questions to use integral-promotion rather than integer-promotion. Does that make sense?

I have already suggested integral-promotion as a synonym for integer-promotion.

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It's a shame [usual-arithmetic-conversions] is too long, that would make a much better category. –  James McNellis Oct 23 '10 at 4:12

2 Answers 2

With due respect to the C++ committee, an integral is the thing in calculus signified by the extra tall "S" thingy. I much prefer [integer-promotion].

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C actually uses integer promotion (C99 6.3.1.1/2).

C90 uses integral promotion (C90 3.2.1.1). C99 changed the wording and replaced most instances of integral with integer, so it uses integer promotions (C99 6.3.1.1/2). The only time integral appears in C99 is when referring to the integral and fractional parts of a floating point number.

C++ uses integral promotion (C++03 4.5).

I agree that they should be synonyms, but which one is the "primary" tag doesn't really matter. Both are correct and mean the same thing. However, some people (especially beginners) tend to get tripped up by the word "integral" (not that that's a spectacular reason not to use it...)

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Apparently, my brain is mushier than I thought. I could have sworn "integral promotion" was C terminology. Thank you for the correction. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 23 '10 at 0:55
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@Sinan: Actually, I was half wrong; C90 does in fact use integral promotion. The language was changed in C99. sigh –  James McNellis Oct 24 '10 at 21:39

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